Monday, October 21, 2013

Conference Announcement of the American Society of Comparative Law Younger Comparativists Committee

The Younger Comparativists Committee of the American Society of Comparative Law is pleased to invite submissions for its third annual conference, to be held on April 4-5, 2014, at Lewis & Clark Law School in Portland, Oregon.  The purpose of the conference is to highlight, develop, and promote the scholarship of new and younger comparativists.

Conference Subject-Matter and Eligibility 

Submissions will be accepted on any subject in public or private comparative law from scholars who have been engaged as law teachers, lecturers, fellows, or in another academic capacity for no more than ten years as of June 30, 2014.  We will also accept submissions from graduate students enrolled in master’s or doctoral programs. 

Submission Instructions

To submit an entry, scholars should email an attachment in Microsoft Word or PDF containing an abstract of no more than 750 words no later than November 1, 2013, to the following address: [email protected].  Abstracts should reflect original research that will not yet have been published, though may have been accepted for publication, by the time of the conference. Abstracts should also include the author’s name, title of the paper, institutional affiliation, contact information, as well as the author’s certification that she/he qualifies as a younger scholar. Graduate students should identify themselves as such.

Scholars may make only one submission.  Both individual and co-authored submissions will be accepted.  For co-authored submissions, both authors must qualify as eligible younger comparativists.  The conference’s Program Committee will assign individual and co-authored submissions to thematic panels according to subject area.  Proposals for fully formed panels will also be accepted.

Notification

Authors of the submissions selected for the conference will be notified no later than December 20, 2013.   There is no cost to register for the conference, but participants are responsible for securing their own funding for travel, lodging and other incidental expenses.  A limited number of travel stipends may be awarded to those who demonstrate financial need.  If you would like to be considered fora travel stipend, please make that request in your submission.

Graduate Student Prize

A prize will be awarded for the best paper submitted by a graduate student.  To be considered for the award, in addition to submitting an abstract by the above deadline, graduate students whose abstracts are accepted for the conference must also submit their papers in their final form byJanuary 31, 2014, to [email protected] with the following subject line:  “Submission forGraduate Student Prize.”  Papers received after January 31, 2014, will not be considered for the award. 

Final papers by faculty members—as well as by graduate students who do not wish to be considered for the Graduate Student Prize—will be due by email to [email protected] no later than March 1, 2014. 

Acknowledgements and Questions

The Younger Comparativists Committee gratefully acknowledges the support of Lewis & Clark Law School.  Please direct all inquiries to Professor Ozan Varol, Chair of the Program Committee, by email at [email protected] or telephone at 503.768.6805.

The Program Committee:

Ozan Varol (Lewis & Clark) (Chair)

Afra Afsharipour (UC Davis)

Nadia Ahmad (Denver)

Richard Albert (Boston College) (YCC Chair)

Antonia Baraggia (Milan)

Lindsey Carson (Toronto)

Claudia Haupt (Columbia)

John Hursh (McGill)

Rajeev Kadambi (Brown)

Joshua Karton (Queen's)

David Landau (Florida State)

Manoj Mate (Whittier)

Salil Mehra (Temple) (YCC Board Member)

Frances Nguyen (Lewis & Clark)

Rene Reich-Graefe (Western New England)

Fritz Siregar (New South Wales)

Ioanna Tourkochoriti (Harvard)

Tim Webster (Case Western)

Posted by Administrators on October 21, 2013 at 06:33 PM in Sponsored Announcements | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Monday, September 30, 2013

Call for Applications: Petrie-Flom Academic Fellowship, 2014-2016

The Petrie-Flom Center is now accepting applications for 2014-2016 Academic Fellowships.

PURPOSE: The Academic Fellowship is a postdoctoral program specifically designed to identify, cultivate, and promote promising scholars early in their careers. Fellows are selected from among recent graduates, young academics, and mid-career practitioners who are committed to spending two years at the Center pursuing publishable research that is likely to make a significant contribution to the field of health law policy, medical innovation policy, or bioethics. For more information about current and past fellows, please visit the Fellowship Programs section of our website.

ELIGIBILITY: By the start of the fellowship term, applicants must hold an advanced degree in a discipline that they intend to apply to issues falling under the Center’s umbrella. The Center particularly encourages applications from those who intend to pursue careers as tenure-track law professors, but will consider any applicant who demonstrates an interest and ability to produce outstanding scholarship at the intersection of law and health policy, bioethics, or biotechnology during the term of the fellowship. Applicants will be evaluated by the quality and probable significance of their research proposals, and by their record of academic and professional achievement.

APPLICATION: Applications will be accepted from September 16, 2013 through November 18, 2013. Please note that applications submitted before November 18 will not be reviewed early.

For more information, see the full call for applications here or contact Administrative Director Cristine Hutchison-Jones.

Posted by Administrators on September 30, 2013 at 08:49 AM in Sponsored Announcements | Permalink | TrackBack

Monday, August 26, 2013

Southeastern Law Scholars Conference: Call for Papers

               The Charleston School of Law is pleased to host the fourth annual Southeastern Law Scholars Conference on October 4-5, 2013.  This regional conference will bring together junior law school faculty to present published papers or works-in-progress across all disciplines within the law.  The conference is open to all junior law faculty (one to seven years teaching experience) at law schools in the United States.  To ensure an atmosphere conducive to feedback, space is limited to twenty participants. 

               The conference will begin with a reception for all participants on Friday, October 4, 2013.  On Saturday, October 5, 2013, conference participants will present either a completed paper or work-in-progress, and comment on the papers and ideas presented by others.  As the host school, the Charleston School of Law will provide breakfast and lunch on Saturday, October 5th.  There is no registration fee.  Participants, however, are responsible for their own travel expenses. 

               To participate in the conference, please send an email to conference organizer, Professor Sheila B. Scheuerman at [email protected] by Monday, September 9, 2013.  Please note whether you will be attending the reception on Friday, October 4th in your email.  In addition, please include the title of your presentation topic and a short abstract.  Please direct any questions, comments or suggestions to Sheila B. Scheuerman at the email address above.  

Posted by Administrators on August 26, 2013 at 03:03 AM in Sponsored Announcements | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Thursday, August 01, 2013

Southeastern Law Scholars Conference

               The Charleston School of Law is pleased to host the fourth annual Southeastern Law Scholars Conference on October 4-5, 2013.  This regional conference will bring together junior law school faculty to present published papers or works-in-progress across all disciplines within the law.  The conference is open to all junior law faculty (one to seven years teaching experience) at law schools in the United States.  To ensure an atmosphere conducive to feedback, space is limited to twenty participants. 

               The conference will begin with a reception for all participants on Friday, October 4, 2013.  On Saturday, October 5, 2013, conference participants will present either a completed paper or work-in-progress, and comment on the papers and ideas presented by others.  As the host school, the Charleston School of Law will provide breakfast and lunch on Saturday, October 5th.  There is no registration fee.  Participants, however, are responsible for their own travel expenses. 

               To participate in the conference, please send an email to conference organizer, Professor Sheila B. Scheuerman at [email protected] by Monday, September 9, 2013.  Please note whether you will be attending the reception on Friday, October 4th in your email.  In addition, please include the title of your presentation topic and a short abstract.  Please direct any questions, comments or suggestions to Sheila B. Scheuerman at the email address above.  

Posted by Administrators on August 1, 2013 at 03:01 AM in Sponsored Announcements | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Monday, July 08, 2013

CFP: Micro-Symposium: Stanley Fish and the Meaning of Academic Freedom

Call for Papers: Micro-Symposium: Stanley Fish and the Meaning of Academic Freedom

FIU Law Review and the FIU College of Law invite contributions for a Micro-Symposium, Stanley Fish and the Meaning of Academic Freedom, to be published in FIU Law Review in 2014. Micro-symposium commentaries will accompany the papers and proceedings of a live roundtable discussion on academic freedom and Stanley Fish’s forthcoming book, Versions of Academic Freedom: From Professionalism to Revolution. Roundtable participants include Dean Robert Post (Yale), Frederick Schauer (Virginia), Fish, and several others. The program will be held at FIU College of Law on Friday, January 24, 2014.

In the book, Fish argues

The academy is the place where knowledge is advanced, where the truth about matters physical, conceptual and social is sought. That’s the job, and that’s also the aspirational norm—the advancement of knowledge and the search for truth. The values of advancing knowledge and discovering truth are not extrinsic to academic activity; they constitute it. . . . These goods and values are also self-justifying in the sense that no higher, supervening, authority undergirds them; they undergird and direct the job and serve as a regulative ideal in relation to which  current ways of doing things can be assessed and perhaps reformed. (The “it’s just a job” is not positivism; it does not reify what is on the books.)

It follows from this specification of the academy’s internal goods that the job can be properly done only if it is undistorted by the interests of outside constituencies, that is, of constituencies that have something other than the search for truth in mind. There are thus limits both on the influences academics can acknowledge and the concerns they can take into account when doing their work. . . . It must be conducted (to return to the l915 Declaration) in “in a scholar’s spirit”, that is with a view to determining what is in fact the case and not with a view to affirming a favored or convenient conclusion. If that is the spirit that animates your academic work, you should be left free to do it, although, with respect to other parts of the job (conforming to departmental protocols, showing up in class, teaching to the syllabus), you are constrained. 

Commentaries may discuss any and all legal, ethical, moral, social, practical, personal, and theoretical aspects of academic freedom, Stanley Fish's new book, or his extensive body of work on academic freedom or any other topic. Interested commenters will be provided manuscripts of Fish's book, on request.

Commentaries can be a maximum of 600 words, including text, footnotes, and title.

Contributions must be received by October 1, 2013. Submit to: [email protected]

Expressions of interest, requests for the manuscript, and other inquiries can be directed to Ben Crego, Law Review Editor-in-Chief, at [email protected] or to Prof. Ediberto Roman at [email protected]

Posted by Howard Wasserman on July 8, 2013 at 11:31 AM in Article Spotlight, Howard Wasserman, Sponsored Announcements | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Wednesday, May 22, 2013

Conference on Privacy and Data Security

 GEORGE MASON LAW & ECONOMICS CENTER PUBLIC POLICY CONFERENCE ON THE LAW & ECONOMICS OF PRIVACY AND DATA SECURITY

 Wednesday, June 19, 2013

George Mason University School of Law (Arlington, VA)

 The Law & Economics Center’s Henry G. Manne Program in Law & Economics Studies will present its Public Policy Conference on the Law & Economics of Privacy and Data Security at George Mason University School of Law, Wednesday, June 19. The conference will run from 8:30 am to 5:00 pm.

OVERVIEW

This conference is organized by Henry N. Butler, Executive Director of the Law & Economics Center and George Mason Foundation Professor of Law, and James C. Cooper, Director, Research and Policy at the Law & Economics Center, and Lecturer in Law, George Mason University School of Law.

Consumers have an incredible array of technologies and services available to them online. As these technologies have progressed, there are growing questions as to what policies are best suited to protect consumers and encourage industry innovation. Topics include the role of the state attorneys general in enforcing privacy laws and a discussion of the rapidly changing landscape of spam, spyware, data portability and industry data retention guidelines.     

 REGISTRATION

You must pre-register for this event online at http://www.cvent.com/d/9cqbrj/4W. 

 

If you have questions, please contact Jeff Smith at [email protected] or 703.993.8382.

 

 AGENDA

Wednesday, June 19, 2013   

 

PANEL 1: Privacy & Data Security: Substitutes and Complements

 

The opening panel will explore the relationship between privacy and data security. To what extent are they complements or substitutes? Is there too much focus on privacy in current policy debates?

 

PANEL 2: Privacy & Data Security Law: Harm and Unfairness

 

The second panel will examine the proper legal framework for dealing with privacy and data security issues, with special attention paid to the meaning of harm under the FTC Act.

 

LUNCHEON DISCUSSION: Privacy and the First Amendment

 

The luncheon program will address the extent to which privacy regulation implicates the First Amendment.

 

PANEL 3: Privacy Tradeoffs: What Do We Know?

 

What do we know about consumer demands for privacy and the efficacy of extant privacy regulation? This panel will examine the state of the empirical evidence germane to the privacy debate.

 

PANEL 4: Privacy and Competition: The Role of Privacy in Antitrust Analysis and How Privacy Regulation Affects Competition

 

The conference will conclude with a panel delving into the interface between privacy and antitrust. The panelists will discuss such issues as: Do firms compete by offering customers more privacy? What role should access to consumer data play in antitrust analysis? and How does privacy regulation affect competition?

 CONFIRMED PANELISTS (as of May 20, 2013):

  • J. Howard Beales III, Professor of Strategic Management and Public Policy, The George Washington University School of Business
  • Daniel W. Caprio, Jr., Senior Strategic Advisor and Independent Consultant, McKenna, Long & Aldridge LLP
  • James C. Cooper, Director, Research and Policy, Law & Economics Center and Lecturer in Law, George Mason University School of Law
  • Lorrie F. Cranor, Associate Professor, Institute for Software Research, Carnegie Mellon University and Director, CyLab Usable Privacy and Security Laboratory
  • Anna Davis, Attorney Advisor to Commissioner Maureen Ohlhausen, Federal Trade Commission
  • Jim Halpert, Partner, DLA Piper
  • Woodrow N. Hartzog, Assistant Professor of Law, Cumberland School of Law, Samford University
  • Jonathan Klick, Professor of Law, University of Pennsylvania Law School
  • Tara Isa Koslov, Deputy Director, Office of Policy Planning, Federal Trade Commission
  • Ryan Kriger, Assistant Attorney General, State of Vermont Office of the Attorney General
  • Thomas M. Lenard, President and Senior Fellow, Technology Policy Institute
  • Paul Ohm, Associate Professor of Law, University of Colorado School of Law
  • Frank A. Pasquale, Schering-Plough Professor in Health Care Regulation and Enforcement, Seton Hall University School of Law
  • Randal C. Picker, Leffmann Professor of Commercial Law, The University of Chicago Law School and Senior Fellow, The Computation Institute of The University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory
  • Sasha Romanosky, Microsoft Research Fellow, Information law Institute, New York University School of Law
  • ·        Paul H. Rubin, Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of Economics, Emory University
  • Adam Thierer, Senior Research Fellow, Mercatus Center at George Mason University
  • Catherine E. Tucker, Mark Hyman, Jr. Career Development Professor and Associate Professor of Marketing, MIT Sloan School of Management
  • Christopher S. Yoo, John H. Chestnut Professor of Law, Communication, and Computer & Information Science and Director, Center for Technology, Innovation & Competition, University of Pennsylvania Law School

 VENUE

Founders Hall Auditorium

George Mason University School of Law

3351 Fairfax Drive

Arlington, VA 22201

 

For further information on the Law & Economics Center, please visit http://www.masonlec.org.

Posted by Administrators on May 22, 2013 at 09:55 PM in Sponsored Announcements | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Tuesday, April 16, 2013

CFP: Sixth Annual Junior Faculty Fed Courts Workshop


CALL FOR PAPERS:

Brooklyn Law School will host the Sixth Annual Junior Faculty Federal Courts Workshop on October 4-5, 2013.  The workshop pairs a senior scholar with a panel of junior scholars presenting works-in-progress.  Confirmed senior scholars will be announced shortly.

The workshop is open to non-tenured and recently tenured academics who teach and write in Federal Courts, Civil Rights Litigation, Civil Procedure, and other associated topics. Those who do not currently hold a faculty appointment but expect to do so beginning in fall 2014 are welcome. The program is also  open to scholars wanting to attend, read, and comment on papers but not present.  There is no registration fee.

The conference will begin with a dinner on Thursday, October 3, then panels on Friday, October 4 and Saturday, October 5. Each panel will consist of 4-5 junior scholars, with a senior scholar serving as moderator and commenter and leading a group discussion on the papers.  Brooklyn Law School will provide all meals for those attending the workshop, including a welcome dinner on Thursday and a reception on Friday.

Those wishing to present a paper must submit an Abstract by June 16, 2013. Papers will be selected by a committee of past participants; presenters will be notified by early July. Those planning to attend must register by August 26, 2013. 

We are setting up a web site and submission e-mail; we will provide all that information as the submission and registration dates draw near. Anyone wanting to submit right away can send abstracts to me at [email protected].

In the meantime, please save the dates of October 4-5.

Posted by Howard Wasserman on April 16, 2013 at 07:17 PM in Civil Procedure, Howard Wasserman, Sponsored Announcements | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Friday, April 12, 2013

Book Announcement: Father, Son, and Constitution

Tom and Ramsey Clark—Defining American Democracy for Three Quarters of a Century


Wohl-book-cover
When Supreme Court Justice Tom Clark resigned his seat on the bench at the youthful age of 67 after 18 years, his decision was unique in the annals of Court history: he was leaving so that his son Ramsey, just nominated as Attorney General, could assume the job Clark himself had once held without conflict of interest. As Alexander Wohl chronicles inside Father, Son, and Constitution: How Justice Tom Clark and Attorney General Ramsey Clark Shaped American Democracy (University Press of Kansas; $39.95; April 30, 2013), for nearly three quarters of a century, Tom and Ramsey Clark influenced presidents, policies, and legal rulings during careers that tracked closely with some of the most significant and controversial episodes in modern American history.

Highlighting the Clarks’ consistent effort to balance individual liberties with government power, Wohl examines how their work reflected the tensions that continue to resonate in today’s legal and policy battles. Politically, the two men evolved quite differently:

• As a young government lawyer, Tom Clark was a key figure in enforcing the relocation of Japanese Americans, and as Attorney General he was vilified by civil liberties advocates for the Cold War policies he implemented, even as he promoted a progressive strategy on civil rights.

• Ramsey Clark began his career to the ideological left of his father, was intimately involved in enforcement of civil rights laws during the turbulent 1960s, as Attorney General fought to expand protections of individual rights, and as a private attorney represented clients on the farthest reaches of the individual rights–government power spectrum.

A unique approach for understanding our nation’s history during the second half of the twentieth-century, Wohl’s study addresses such salient issues as: civil rights, free speech, government surveillance and rights of privacy, presidential power, and the role of judges in interpreting the Constitution. The Clarks’ lives and careers also offer a veritable who’s who of 20th-century American law and policy: from Tom’s close relationships with Harry Truman, Lyndon Johnson, Sam Rayburn, and Earl Warren, to Ramsey’s connections with Robert Kennedy, LBJ, and Martin Luther King Jr. Both men befriended and battled J. Edgar Hoover and both were targets of political attack—twenty years apart—by Richard Nixon. At its fundamental core, however, Wohl’s book presents a moving and intimate portrait of a unique father-son relationship that endured through triumph and tribulation and that should appeal to anyone interested in how personal and political views intertwine in a highly public setting.

ABOUT ALEXANDER WOHL

Alexander Wohl, a former Supreme Court Judicial Fellow and Supreme Court correspondent for the San Francisco Chronicle, is an adjunct professor at American University’s Washington College of Law.

Accolades

“A well-written, finely-crafted, and fascinating account of the lives and careers of two men who were linked together by blood and history. . . . A notable contribution to the political, legal, and social history of our times.” —Lawrence M. Friedman, author of A History of American Law

“Fills a significant void in the literature on the Supreme Court and American law and politics.” —David M. O’Brien, author of Storm Center: The Supreme Court in American Politics

Father, Son, and Constitution: How Justice Tom Clark and Attorney General Ramsey Clark Shaped American Democracy By Alexander Wohl Published by University Press of Kansas • April 30, 2013 • Suggested retail: $39.95 Hardcover: 448 pages, 29 photographs, 6 x 9 • ISBN 978-0-7006-1916-0 

Available at amazon.com

Posted by Administrators on April 12, 2013 at 12:00 AM in Sponsored Announcements | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack

Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Symposium on the gender gap in the workplace

FIU Law Review will host Minding the Gap: Reflections on the Achievement Gap between Men and Women in the Workplace in 2013, this Friday, March 1. The conference is organized by my FIU colleague (and alumna Guest Prawf) Kerri Stone. Presenters include former guests Nancy Leong (Denver) and Marcia McCormick (Saint Louis), along with several top employment/employment discrimination scholars.

The symposium will be published in June 2013.

Posted by Howard Wasserman on February 26, 2013 at 10:31 AM in Article Spotlight, Howard Wasserman, Sponsored Announcements | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Monday, August 20, 2012

Chair Search at Tulane Law

Tulane University Law School is currently seeking candidates to fill its recently vacated chair in comparative law, the Eason-Weinmann Chair of Comparative Law, and one of two chairs without subject-matter restriction, the recently vacated Joseph Merrick Jones Chair of Law, and the new David Boies Distinguished Chair in Law. This position will entail an appointment to an endowed chair to be made at the level of tenured, full Professor of Law. The responsibilities of the Eason-Weinmann Chair of Comparative Law may include directorship of the Eason-Weinmann Center for International and Comparative Law. Any chair includes scholarly research and publication; classroom teaching; participation in faculty governance; active involvement in student mentoring and counseling; engagement with faculty both within the Law School and throughout the University; together with other chairs and senior faculty, providing leadership for integrative research activities; significant engagement with academic institutions and professional organizations in international law, including frequent participation in meetings and symposia.

The qualifications required for the chairs are:

• Juris Doctor (J.D.) and/or Ph.D. in Law

• Broad recognition for scholarly distinction

• Established publication record

• Clearly developed long term research agenda

• Extensive teaching experience

Interested candidates should submit an application in hard copy or electronic form to the Chair of the Search Committee: Claire Moore Dickerson, Senator John B. Breaux Chair of Business Law, Tulane University Law School, 6329 Freret Street New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 USA, or via email at: [email protected]

The application should include:

• A letter of interest highlighting experiences and accomplishments relevant to the position • A current curriculum vitae • Names of and contact information regarding three professional references.

Nominations of qualified candidates for one or more of the chair positions also are invited. Nominations should be submitted to Professor Dickerson at the address above. For further inquiries, please contact the search committee through Professor Dickerson at that same email address. Review of applications will begin in the fall and continue until completion. For further information about Tulane University Law School, consult:www.law.tulane.edu.

Tulane University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer with a strong commitment to diversifying its faculty.

Posted by Administrators on August 20, 2012 at 09:24 PM in Sponsored Announcements | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Tuesday, August 07, 2012

Southeastern Law Scholars Conference

The Charleston School of Law is pleased to host the third annual Southeastern Law Scholars Conference on September 21-22, 2012.  This regional conference will bring together junior law school faculty to present published papers or works-in-progress across all disciplines within the law.  The conference is open to all junior law faculty (one to seven years teaching experience) at law schools in the United States.  To ensure an atmosphere conducive to feedback, space is limited to twenty participants. 

The conference will begin with a reception for all participants on Friday, September 21, 2012.  On Saturday, September 22, 2012, conference participants will present either a completed paper or work-in-progress, and comment on the papers and ideas presented by others.  As the host school, the Charleston School of Law will provide breakfast and lunch on Saturday, September 22.  There is no registration fee.  Participants, however, are responsible for their own travel expenses. 

To participate in the conference, please send an email to conference organizer, Professor Sheila B. Scheuerman at [email protected] by Friday, August 31, 2012.  Please note whether you will be attending the reception on Friday, September 21, in your email.  In addition, please include the title of your presentation topic.  A short abstract would also be helpful.  Please direct any questions, comments or suggestions to Sheila B. Scheuerman at the email address above. 

 

 

Posted by Administrators on August 7, 2012 at 09:05 AM in Sponsored Announcements | Permalink | TrackBack

Wednesday, August 01, 2012

2013-2015 Academic Fellowship Program at the The Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School

The Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School is currently accepting applications for the 2013-2015 Academic Fellowship Program.  The application deadline is November 16, 2012. 

The Fellowship is a postdoctoral program designed to identify, cultivate and promote promising scholars early in their careers. Fellows are selected from among recent graduates, young academics and mid-career practitioners who are committed to spending two years in residence at the Center pursuing publishable independent research that is likely to make a significant contribution to the field of health law policy, medical innovation policy or bioethics. Our prior fellows have found employment as law professors at Harvard, UC Berkeley, BU, UCLA, Cornell, the University of Arizona, and the University of Illinois. 

Please see the full call for further details regarding eligibility, stipend and benefits, and application requirements: http://www.law.harvard.edu/programs/petrie-flom/fellowship/pdf/afcfa2013.pdf

 

Posted by Administrators on August 1, 2012 at 09:47 AM in Getting a Job on the Law Teaching Market, Sponsored Announcements | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Thursday, February 02, 2012

4th Annual Junior Faculty Federal Courts Workshop

The 4th Annual Junior Faculty Federal Courts Workshop will (finally) take place at FIU beginning at 9 a.m. tomorrow morning. There is a terrific slate of papers on a wide range of Fed Courts issues, so it should make for some very interesting conversations. And we have a great group of senior mentors--Janet Alexander (Stanford), Susan Bandes (Miami), Ted Eisenberg (Cornell), Lee Epstein (USC), Marty Redish (Northwestern), and Suzanna Sherry (Vanderbilt).  A full schedule for the conference, with links to all the papers. is here.

And, if you weren't able to make it this time, know that plans for the 5th Annual Junior Faculty Federal Courts Workshop are already under way: Tara Leigh Grove will host the next workshop at William & Mary next fall.

Posted by Howard Wasserman on February 2, 2012 at 12:31 PM in Article Spotlight, Howard Wasserman, Sponsored Announcements | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Monday, January 02, 2012

Schedule: Junior Facutly Fed Courts Workshop

As previously announced, the Fourth Annual Junior Faculty Federal Courts Workshop will be held at FIU College of Law on February 2-4, 2012.

The conference is open to non-presenters, both junior and senior; the cost for attendance is to read the papers and be ready to ask questions and make comments. For those attending, a block of rooms has been reserved at the Hampton Inn & Suits Miami/Brickell-Downtown, 50 SW 12th Street, Miami. The block is for Thursday, February 2 through Saturday, February 4, although anyone wanting to stay over until Sunday morning can request the extra night. The conference rate is $ 209 per night. To reserve rooms, contact Christine Joo at (305) 377-9400 or [email protected]; tell her you are with this conference. Please call to reserve your room by January 5, 2012.

There will be a conference dinner on Thursday evening, at a restaurant within walking distance of the hotel and a dinner reception at the College of Law on Friday evening, following the last panels. We should be done by around 2 p.m. on Saturday. The College of Law will provide transportation between the hotel and the College of Law.

Papers will be posted to the FIU College of Law website (law.fiu.edu) by January 20.

The schedule of panels after the jump (thanks to Lou Mulligan and Jamelle Sharp, the two most recent hosts of the conference) for their help in selecting and organizing the papers.

Friday, February 3

Panel I: Judicial Decisionmaking (Mentor: Lee Epstein)

Margaret Thomas, The Federalism Canons of Statutory Interpretation as a Constraint on the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure

Nancy Leong, Making Remedies

Elizabeth McCuskey, Clarity and Clarification: Grable Federal Questions in the Eyes of Their Beholders

Paul Gugliuzza, Patent Law's Uniformity Principle and the Consequences of Judicial Specialization 

Panel II: Judicial Capacity and Executive Action (Mentor: Susan Bandes)

Saul Zipkin, A Common Law Court in a Regulatory World

Andrew Coan, Judicial Capacity and the Substance of Constitutional Law

John Greabe, Making Use of Small Spaces: Re-Conceptualizing Rights as Sources of Judicial Lawmaking Authority

Sandra Sperino, Statutory Proximate Cause

Panel III: Structuring Litigation (Mentor: Theodore Eisenberg)

Corey Yung, Judging Styles

Josh Douglas, Procedural Fairness in Election Contests

Mark Spottswood, Evidence-Based Litigation Reform

Shay Lavie, The Malleability of Collective Litigation

Panel IV: State-Federal Relations (Mentor: Suzanna Sherry)

Verity Winship, Aligning Choice of Law and Choice of Forum

Sergio Campos, Erie as Enforcement Default Law

Samuel Jordan, Reconceptualizing Judicial Federalism

Charlton Copeland, Race, Trust and American Federalism

Saturday, February 4:

Panel V: Article III Jurisdiction (Mentor: Martin Redish)

Matt Hall, Standing to Defend

Dustin Benham, Article III's Promise to the Lower Federal Courts: An Irreducible Version of Judicial Power

Alex Glahausser, The Extension Clause and the Independence of the Supreme Court's Jurisdiction

Justin Pidot, Rethinking Jurisdictional Procedure: Promoting Justice, Efficiency and Separation of Powers

Panel VI: Interpretation (Mentor: Janet Alexander) 

Johanna Kalb, Intersystemic Treaty Interpretation: A Space for the State

Robin Effron, When the Perfect Becomes the Enemy of the Good: The Relatedness Problem in Personal Jurisdiction

Paul Stancil, Lead Us Not Into Temptation: Congressional Silence and the Statutory Interpretation Game

Robert Jones, Lessons from a Lost Constitution

Posted by Howard Wasserman on January 2, 2012 at 09:41 AM in Civil Procedure, Howard Wasserman, Sponsored Announcements | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Sunday, November 13, 2011

Deadline Looming: 4th Junior Faculty Federal Courts Workshop

The deadline for submitting abstracts is this Tuesday, November 15. Presentation spaces still available. Details can be found here.

Posted by Howard Wasserman on November 13, 2011 at 09:03 AM in Howard Wasserman, Sponsored Announcements | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Wednesday, November 02, 2011

Repost: 4th Annual Junior Fed Courts Faculty Workshop

This is a reposting and reminder of earlier announcement of the Fourth Annual Junior Faculty Federal Court Workshop, which will be held February 2-4, 2012, at FIU College of Law.

The workshop pairs a senior scholar with a panel of junior scholars presenting works-in-progress. Five senior scholars have confirmed participation this year: Susan Bandes (University of Miami), Lee Epstein (USC), Theodore Eisenberg (Cornell University), Martin Redish (Northwestern University), Suzanna Sherry (Vanderbilt University).

This year, we are spreading the conference out over two days (meaning an extra day in Miami in February, not a bad thing). It begins with a dinner on Thursday, February 2, then panels on Friday and Saturday. Each panel will consist of 4-5 junior scholars, with a senior scholar serving as moderator and commenter and leading a group discussion on the papers.

The workshop is open to non-tenured and recently tenured academics who teach and write in Federal Courts, Civil Rights Litigation, and associated topics. Those who do not currently hold a faculty appointment but expect to do so beginning in fall 2012 are welcome. The program is also  open to scholars wanting to attend, read, and comment on papers but not present.  There is no registration fee.

Those wishing to present a paper should submit an Abstract (of no more than 250 words) by Tuesday, November 15 to [email protected] Papers will be selected by a committee of past participants; presenters will be notified by December 10. Those planning to attend must register by January 10, 2012. The program is also open to non-presenters who want to attend, read and comment on papers, and participate in the discussion.

More details will be forthcoming next month. In the meantime, if you are interested in presenting, please get your abstracts/proposals to me by the 15th.

Posted by Howard Wasserman on November 2, 2011 at 10:31 AM in Howard Wasserman, Sponsored Announcements | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Monday, September 12, 2011

4th Annual Junior Faculty Federal Courts Workshop

FIU College of Law will host the Fourth Annual Junior Faculty Federal Court Workshop on February 2-4, 2012. This program was started at American University back in 2008 by PermaPrawf Steve Vladeck and has become an annual event in the Fed Courts scholarly community.

The workshop pairs a senior scholar with a panel of junior scholars presenting works-in-progress. Five senior scholars have confirmed participation this year: Susan Bandes (University of Miami), Lee Epstein (USC), Theodore Eisenberg (Cornell University), Martin Redish (Northwestern University), and Suzanna Sherry (Vanderbilt University).

This year, we are spreading the conference out over two days (meaning an extra day in Miami in February, not a bad thing). It begins with a dinner on Thursday, February 2, then panels on Friday and Saturday. Each panel will consist of 4-5 junior scholars, with a senior scholar serving as moderator and commenter and leading a group discussion on the papers.

The workshop is open to non-tenured and recently tenured academics who teach and write in Federal Courts, Civil Rights Litigation, and associated topics. Those who do not currently hold a faculty appointment but expect to do so beginning in fall 2012 are welcome. The program is also  open to scholars wanting to attend, read, and comment on papers but not present.  There is no registration fee.

FIU will cover all meals for those attending the workshop, including a welcome dinner on Thursday and reception on Friday. The College of Law has arranged for a discounted block of rooms at the Westin Colonnade in Coral Gables, as well as transportation to the College of Law. Go to the Conference website for more information.

Those wishing to present a paper must submit an Abstract by November 15. Papers will be selected by a committee of past participants; presenters will be notified by December 10. Those planning to attend must register by January 10, 2012. The program is also open to non-presenters who want to attend, read and comment on papers, and participate in the discussion.

We are setting up a web site and submission e-mail; we will provide all that information as the submission and registration dates draw near. Anyone wanting to submit right away can send abstracts to me at [email protected]

In the meantime, save the dates of February 2-4.

Posted by Howard Wasserman on September 12, 2011 at 09:31 AM in Howard Wasserman, Life of Law Schools, Sponsored Announcements, Teaching Law | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack

Tuesday, May 10, 2011

Race and Criminal Justice in the West

Conference Announcement and Call for Papers

Race and Criminal Justice in the West

Gonzaga University School of Law

Spokane, WA

Friday-Saturday, September 23-24, 2011

Sponsored by:

Gonzaga University School of Law

The Task Force on Race and the Criminal Justice System

Description

This conference seeks to examine the topic of race and the criminal justice system in the Western states.  Racial minorities continue to be overrepresented in our criminal justice system; yet too often concerns about the high arrest and incarceration rates are dismissed as simply the result of a high rate of criminality.  This conference will explore the role of bias, both conscious and unconscious, to ask whether race still matters in our criminal justice system.  While the emphasis will be on the West, we welcome papers and presentations focusing on other areas of the country, particularly ones that engage in comparative analyses. 

Examples of the topics we expect to explore include:

  • historical treatment of racial minorities with crime in the West
  • empirical research examining the role of racial bias in the criminal justice system
  • changing demographics and immigration reform
  • unique experiences of African-Americans, Asian-Americans, Latinas/os, and Native Americans with the criminal justice system
  • role and impact of police actions, prosecutorial discretion, and judicial decisions
  • comparative analyses of the criminal justice in the West with other areas of the country
  • solutions for addressing the problem of racial bias

 

We invite scholars, practicing lawyers, prosecutors, judges, law enforcement officials, and engaged citizens to submit proposals for individual papers and presentations dealing with these and related issues.  We also seek your participation as panel moderators.

The Honorable Barbara Madsen, Chief Justice of the Washington Supreme Court, will be delivering the keynote address on Friday, September 23.

Papers selected for publication will be published by the Gonzaga Law Review in a special symposium issue.

We anticipate approving the conference for CLE credit.

Proposal Submissions

Proposals must contain the following information:

  • Name, Address, Phone, and e-mail
  • Title of Presentation and whether you seek, additionally, to submit a Paper for publication
  • A statement of up to 300 words explaining your topic

 We welcome suggestions for full or partial panels.  If you suggest a panel, please be certain to submit the above information for each participant. 

If you would be willing to serve as a moderator, please indicate that on your proposal.

Deadline for submission of proposals is June 6, 2011.  Please submit proposals via e-mail to Professor Jason Gillmer at [email protected].  Those submitting can expect to receive a response by July 1, 2011. 

Final drafts of papers will be due October 24, 2011. Publication decisions for papers will be made by the Gonzaga Law Review.  

 

Posted by Administrators on May 10, 2011 at 12:38 PM in Sponsored Announcements | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Wednesday, March 23, 2011

Racial Blindsight Conference at Michigan State

The Michigan State University College of Law is hosting a symposium entitled "Moving Beyond 'Racial Blindsight'? The Influence of Social Science Evidence after the North Carolina Racial Justice Act."  This webpage includes an introduction and an invitation for this upcoming event:

The North Carolina Racial Justice Act of 2009 (RJA) broke new ground in its recognition of the role that social science research can play in identifying racial discrimination in the criminal justice system.

The RJA expressly authorizes a claimant to rely on statistical evidence of race of defendant discrimination, race of victim discrimination, or racial discrimination in jury selection.  This directly confronts the legacy of McCleskey v. Kemp(1987), which foreclosed the possibility of meaningful analysis of the role of race in death penalty systems by denying claimants the possibility of bringing claims based on social science research.  McCleskey left defendants in search of the ever-elusive smoking gun....

By allowing capital defendants to assert race discrimination through statistical evidence encompassing more than a single defendant’s case, the North Carolina legislature demonstrated a willingness to move beyond the McCleskeystraightjacket when addressing claims of race discrimination.  This symposium addresses not only the implication of such a remarkable shift for the death penalty in North Carolina, but also the possibility that the RJA heralds a new openness to the use of social science research to inform questions obscured through exclusive reliance on direct evidence.

The exact contours of the symposium are still taking shape. We are delighted to have confirmed participation from a number of scholars already, including David Baldus, Jeffrey Fagan, Sam Gross, and Michael Radelet.  If you have work that would contribute to this discussion, please consider participating.

 

Posted by Administrators on March 23, 2011 at 12:55 PM in Sponsored Announcements | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Tuesday, November 30, 2010

4th International Conference on the Globalization of Collective Litigation

FIU College of Law will host the 4th International Conference on the Globalization of Collective Litigation on Friday, December 10.  The program has been organized by Deborah Hensler (Stanford) and Manuel Gomez (my FIU colleague). The conference brings together academics, policy analysts, and practitioners to discuss issues of collective litigation around the world, with a special focus on Latin America.

 

 

Posted by Howard Wasserman on November 30, 2010 at 09:01 AM in Civil Procedure, Howard Wasserman, Sponsored Announcements | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Wednesday, November 17, 2010

FIU Law Review Symposium Now On-Line

Podcasts of last week's symposium at FIU, Cure, Botch, or Opiate? Law, Politics, Policies, & the Constitutionality of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, are available. It is worth a listen. The symposium hopefully will be published in Spring/Summer 2011.

Posted by Howard Wasserman on November 17, 2010 at 01:19 PM in Current Affairs, Howard Wasserman, Sponsored Announcements | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Tuesday, November 09, 2010

FIU Law Review Symposium: Cure, Botch, or Opiate?

This Friday, November 12, FIU Law Review and FIU College of Law will sponsor Cure, Botch, or Opiate? Law, Politics, Policies, & the Constitutionality of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, a comprehensive discussion of the law and politics of health reform legislation. The symposium program is here .

Participants include Gerard Magliocca (Indiana-Indianapolis), David Rivkin, Ilya Shapiro (Cato Institute), Kevin Sack (The New York Times), David Freddoso (Washington Examiner), David Orentlicher (Indiana-Indianapolis), Frank Pasquale (Seton Hall and former GuestPrawf), Elizabeth Pendo (Saint Louis University), and Dr. Fernando Valverde (FIU Wertheim College of Medicine). My colleague Elizabeth Foley and I will serve as moderators.

Please stop by if you will be in Miami this Friday.


Posted by Howard Wasserman on November 9, 2010 at 09:19 AM in Howard Wasserman, Sponsored Announcements | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Wednesday, September 15, 2010

Gonzaga Law and the Curran Chair in Legal Ethics

Curran Chair

Gonzaga University School of Law seeks applications for the newly established Donald Curran and VaLena Scarpellli Curran Professor of Legal Ethics.  The purpose of this chair is to advance teaching and scholarship in the areas of ethics and professionalism.  The chair holder will be expected to fulfill the normal responsibilities of a faculty member and to be a leader in the area of professional development.  For example, the chair is expected to participate in seminars and projects with local, state, and national organizations, take an active interest in providing education to the bench and bar, and to publish regularly.  Tenured faculty applicants with a proven publication record are preferred.  The law school is strongly committed to diversifying its faculty and furthering Gonzaga’s mission as a Jesuit, Catholic and humanistic institution.   Application is encouraged by December 3, 2010.  To apply, send a resume and letter outlining relevant experience and teaching interests to Professor Cheryl Ann Beckett, Chair, Faculty Recruitment Committee, Gonzaga University School of Law, P.O. Box 3528, Spokane, Washington 99220-3528, or contact Professor Beckett by e-mail at [email protected].

 

Posted by Administrators on September 15, 2010 at 04:35 PM in Sponsored Announcements | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Tuesday, June 22, 2010

Welcome to CALI's E-Landgell Sponsorship

We are thrilled to welcome the sponsorship of CALI (the Center for Computer Assisted Legal Instruction) for the next two months. CALI is beginning an initiative that should intrigue the Prawfs readership: they are about to begin publishing digital casebooks that can be distributed via readers such as Kindle and iPad and they are keen to have prawfs create and edit content for them to distribute. You can learn more about CALI's e-Landgell project over here. Thanks again, CALI, and welcome to Prawfs.

Posted by Administrators on June 22, 2010 at 08:30 PM in Sponsored Announcements | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack

Tuesday, March 23, 2010

FIU Law Review Symposium: Whither the Board? The National Labor Relations Board at 75

This Friday and Saturday, March 26-27, FIU Law Review will host a symposium, entitled Whither the Board? The National Labor Relations Board at 75. The keynote speaker is current NLRB Chair Wilma Liebman, with remarks by Board Member Peter Schaumber. Presenters include Prawf's own Matt Bodie, FIU College of Law Dean (and former Board member) Alex Acosta, and many of the top labor scholars and practitioners.

Kudos and congratulations to my FIU colleague Kerri Stone, and the Law Review editors, for putting together what promises to be a great program.

Posted by Howard Wasserman on March 23, 2010 at 04:28 PM in Howard Wasserman, Sponsored Announcements | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Friday, May 29, 2009

Urgent Sponsored Announcement from University of Tusla

THE UNIVERSITY OF TULSA COLLEGE OF LAW is urgently seeking a visitor to teach Environmental Law in either Fall 2009 or Spring 2010. The College of Law is particularly interested in talking to candidates who are also willing to teach International Environmental Law, European Union Law, International Law, Antitrust, Banking, Corporate finance, Securities or other business related courses. Candidates interested in teaching Environmental Law along with some other course not listed should also apply as there is some flexibility with respect to course offerings. The visit may be for one semester or for the full academic year. Salaries are negotiable depending upon length of appointment and qualifications. Candidates must possess a J.D. degree from an accredited law school. We seek candidates with superior academic records from highly-regarded J.D. and/or graduate law programs who have a proven record of excellence in teaching and scholarship or have, through their professional and academic performance demonstrated superior potential to excel as teachers and scholars. The University of Tulsa is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer committed to diversifying its faculty and staff. Members of under-represented groups (including people of color, people with disabilities, women and veterans) are strongly encouraged to apply. Please submit (1) letters of interest indicating qualifications and other teaching interests, (2( a current curriculum vitae, and (3) letter of recommendation to Assoc. Professor Tamara Piety, Chair, Appointments Committee, University of Tulsa College of Law, 3120 E. Fourth Place., Tulsa, OK 74104, or by email to [email protected]

Posted by Administrators on May 29, 2009 at 06:32 PM in Sponsored Announcements | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack

Thursday, April 02, 2009

Hello and a Conference Announcement

Thank you so much to Dan and PrawfsBlawg for inviting me to post here again. I teach at Gonzaga University School of Law in eastern Washington State, where Mother Nature played a bit of an April Fool's Day joke on us this week by fooling us into thinking that winter had ended. Hopefully better weather will greet us for the start of the baseball season this Sunday evening!

I look forward to posting on an assortment of topics this month, but let me begin with a conference announcement that hopefully will interest some readers. Our law school co-directs the Institute for Law Teaching and Learning with Washburn University School of Law, and this June 23-24 we are hosting the Institute's summer conference, Implementing Best Practices and Educating Lawyers: Teaching Skills and Professionalism across the Curriculum. The program looks great, and the Spokane area is quite lovely in the summer, so we hope to see many of you here. Full details on the conference can be found in the most recent edition of The Law Teacher.

Posted by Brooks Holland on April 2, 2009 at 07:26 PM in Blogging, Sponsored Announcements, Teaching Law | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Wednesday, April 30, 2008

Advertisement: Legal Writing Competition Sponsored by the Pacific Legal Foundation

To augment the ongoing efforts of the Program for Judicial Awareness to encourage legal scholarship related to Pacific Legal Foundation’s litigation objectives, we are pleased to announce three new awards, made possible by a generous grant from the John Templeton Foundation.

FOR LAW STUDENTS:

The John Templeton Foundation Essay on Freedom and Free Enterprise
$5,000

The Program for Judicial Awareness invites students enrolled in law schools in the United States to submit original, publishable essays related to one or more of the Legal Objectives of Pacific Legal Foundation. The successful essay, suitable for publication in a law review or comparable academic journal, should draw together issues of public policy, matters of constitutional interpretation, and current legal precedent to postulate how statutes or policies should be applied in order to protect freedom and defend free enterprise. Submissions must be received by July 1, 2008, and the $5,000 award to the winning entry will be announced on August 29, 2008.

FOR NON-TENURED LAW PROFESSORS:

The John Templeton Foundation Academic Scholarship Award
$5,000

This award encourages junior faculty members at American law schools to add to the body of legal-academic scholarship in support of freedom and free enterprise. Parallel to the student essay competition described above, entries should consist of original, publishable papers relating to one or more of Pacific Legal Foundation’s Legal Objectives. The entry deemed by the Program for Judicial Awareness to best meet these criteria will be awarded The John Templeton Foundation Academic Scholarship Award of $5,000. Submissions must be received by July 1, 2008, and the award will be announced on August 29, 2008.

FOR TENURED LAW PROFESSORS:

The John Templeton Foundation Academic Scholarship Award
$5,000

Tenured professors at law schools in the United States are invited to submit proposals for research leading to the publication of a law review article or comparable legal scholarship. The thesis of the proposed research should relate to one or more of Pacific Legal Foundation’s litigation Objectives and to the protection or advancement of freedom and free enterprise. The proposal that, in the judgment of the Program for Judicial Awareness, best meets these criteria will be awarded the John Templeton Foundation Legal Research Grant. Proposals must be received by July 1, 2008, to qualify for the 2008 grant. For details, contact Cindy Turpin.

Posted by Administrators on April 30, 2008 at 09:43 AM in Sponsored Announcements | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack