Tuesday, July 28, 2020

Will My Law School Perish?

Higher education is facing an economically challenging time due to lost revenues brought upon by the COVID-19 pandemic. And as we saw with the closure of Concordia Law School this summer, law schools are no exception. NYU advertising professor Scott Galloway has crunched the numbers for “the immunities and comorbidities of 436 universities included in US News and World Report’s Top National College Rankings.” And he predicts about 20% of these institutions entered the pandemic on such shaky ground that COVID-19 will be the death blow to them. In short, one in five of these universities or colleges will perish.

To calculate this, he looked at a series of variables to create the following scores:

  • Credential score (US News ranking, undergrad admit rate, average monthly Google search volume)
  • Experience score (student life grade and score)
  • Education score (various return on investment measures)
  • Average undergrad tuition & fees score
  • Value-to-cost ratio
  • Vulnerability score (endowment per full time student and percentage of international students)

From these he created two main measures: Value and Vulnerability. And based on whether one was high or low on these measures, he created four quadrants of schools: Thrive, Survive, Struggle, or Perish. Thus, a university with low value and high vulnerability falls into the perish quadrant, whereas a university with high value and low vulnerability falls in the thrive quadrant. The data can be found here.

I took these institutional assessments and matched them up with the U.S. News Law School Rankings (see below). Based on Professor Galloway’s predictions, 18 law schools will perish in the near future (because their university will perish). That is 1 school in the top 50, 5 in the 51-100, 5 in the 101-147, and 7 in the unranked law schools. I have listed them below in order of ranking:

27

Fordham

53

Cardozo (Yeshiva)

62

Seton Hall

70

Loyola (Chicago)

83

Chicago-Kent

93

Drexel

102

Hofstra

111

Chapman

118

DePaul

136

Pace

141

Willamette

148-194

Campbell

148-194

Elon

148-194

New England

148-194

Nova Southeastern

148-194

Detroit Mercy

148-194

Massachusetts-Dartmouth

148-194

Pacific

Another 28 schools are predicted to struggle:

50

Baylor

93

Lewis & Clark

105

Drake

111

Catholic

111

Tulsa

118

U. St. Thomas (MN)

122

Quinnipiac

122

Maine

122

Montana

126

Loyola-New Orleans

126

Mercer

129

Belmont

129

Seattle

141

Dayton

Now, before too much panic sets in, Professor Galloway doesn’t think this is all set in stone. Things can be done to save these universities.

What is more, as the old saying goes, all models are wrong, some are useful. Just how wrong is his model? From anecdotal evidence, quite wrong at times it would seem. Take my institution, for example. Chapman is designated to perish under Prof. Galloway’s calculations. Yet Chapman is doing quite well right now--so well, that not only has it not had to lay off faculty, it hasn’t even had to cut their pay. Hardly the stuff of an institution that is about to perish. Chapman isn't even struggling, so it seems it would be better to put it in at least the Survive, if not the Thrive category. That shows how far off Galloway's model is, at least in that once instance. And there are a host of questions regarding whether these are the correct measures to include in the model, whether they have been given the right weight, and whether anything important is missing? So these predictions must be taken with a gallon of salt. Further, just because a university perishes doesn't necessarily mean that its law school will.

Still, there is no doubt the pandemic may thin the herd, so to speak, of American law schools. Just how much thinning, and which schools, remains to be seen.

US News Ranking

Law School

Galloway Categorization

1

Yale

Thrive

2

Stanford

Thrive

3

Harvard

Thrive

4

Columbia

Survive

4

Chicago

Survive

6

NYU

Survive

7

U. Penn.

Thrive

8

Virginia

Thrive

9

Northwestern

Thrive

9

UC-Berkeley

Survive

9

Michigan

Thrive

12

Duke

Thrive

13

Cornell

Thrive

14

Georgetown

Survive

15

UCLA

Survive

16

UT-Austin

Thrive

17

Wash. U.

Thrive

18

USC

Survive

18

Vanderbilt

Survive

20

Boston University

Survive

21

Minnesota

Survive

22

Notre Dame

Thrive

23

George Washington

Survive

24

Arizona State

Survive

24

Emory

Survive

24

Florida

Survive

27

Fordham

Perish

27

UC-Irvine

Survive

27

Iowa

Survive

27

North Carolina

Thrive

31

Boston College

Thrive

31

Alabama

Survive

31

Georiga

Thrive

31

Illinois

Survive

31

Washington & Lee

Thrive

31

William & Mary

Survive

37

BYU

Thrive

38

Indiana

Survive

38

Ohio State

Survive

38

UC-Davis

Survive

38

Wisconsin

Survive

42

George Mason

Survive

42

U. Washington

Survive

42

Wake Forest

Survive

45

Utah

Survive

46

Colorado

Survive

47

Pepperdine

Survive

47

Arizona 

Survive

47

Maryland

Survive

50

Baylor

Struggle

50

Florida State

Survive

50

Connecticut

Survive

53

Cardozo (Yeshiva)

Perish

54

Tulane

Thrive

54

Richmond

Thrive

56

Southern Methodist

Thrive

56

Temple

Survive

56

Houston

Survive

59

UC-Hastings

n/a

60

Penn State-University Park

Survive

60

Texas A&M

Thrive

62

Loyola Marymount

Survive

62

Penn State-Carlisle

n/a

62

Seton Hall

Perish

62

UNLV

n/a

62

Villanova

Thrive

67

Northeastern

Survive

67

Miami

Survive

67

Missouri (Columbia)

Thrive

70

Loyola (Chicago)

Perish

70

Kansas

Thrive

70

Kentucky

Thrive

70

Tennessee

n/a

74

St. Johns

n/a

74

Denver

Survive

76

American

Thrive

76

Case Western

Survive

76

Georgia State

Survive

76

Rutgers

Survive

76

Nebraska

Survive

76

Oklahoma

Survive

76

Pittsburgh

Thrive

83

Brooklyn

n/a

83

Chicago-Kent

Perish

83

Cincinnati

Thrive

83

San Diego

Thrive

83

Wayne State

Thrive

88

New Hampshire

Thrive

88

Oregon

Survive

90

Florida International

Survive

90

St. Louis

Thrive

90

Arkansas-Fayetteville

Thrive

93

Drexel

Perish

93

Lewis & Clark

Struggle

93

Michigan State

Survive

96

LSU-Baton Rouge

Thrive

96

Hawaii

Survive

96

South Carolina

Thrive

99

Buffalo-SUNY

Survive

99

Louisville

Thrive

99

New Mexico

Survive

102

Cleveland State

n/a

102

Hofstra

Perish

102

Marquette

Thrive

105

Drake

Struggle

105

Stetson

n/a

107

CUNY

Survive

107

Howard

Thrive

107

Santa Clara

Survive

107

Washburn

n/a

111

Chapman

Perish

111

Syracuse

Survive

111

Texas Tech

Survive

111

Catholic

Struggle

111

Mississippi

Thrive

111

Tulsa

Struggle

111

West Virginia

Survive

118

Albany

Survive

118

DePaul

Perish

118

Gonzaga

Survive

118

U. St. Thomas (MN)

Struggle

122

Indiana-Indianapolis

Thrive

122

Quinnipiac

Struggle

122

Maine

Struggle

122

Montana

Struggle

126

Loyola-New Orleans

Struggle

126

Mercer

Struggle

126

Baltimore

n/a

129

Belmont

Struggle

129

Duquesne

Thrive

129

New York Law School

n/a

129

Seattle

Struggle

133

Creighton

Thrive

133

Missouri-Kansas City

Survive

133

Wyoming

Thrive

136

Pace

Perish

136

Suffolk

n/a

136

Idaho

Thrive

136

Toledo

n/a

140

Illinois-Chicago

Survive

141

Mitchell Hamline

n/a

141

Akron

n/a

141

Dayton

Struggle

141

Memphis

Survive

141

South Dakota

Thrive

141

Vermont

Thrive

141

Willamette

Perish

148-194

Appalachian

n/a

148-194

Atlanta's John Marshall

n/a

148-194

Ave Maria

n/a

148-194

Barry

n/a

148-194

California Western

n/a

148-194

Campbell

Perish

148-194

Capital

n/a

148-194

Charleston

n/a

148-194

Elon

Perish

148-194

Faulkner

n/a

148-194

Florida A&M

n/a

148-194

Florida Coastal

n/a

148-194

Golden Gate

n/a

148-194

Liberty

n/a

148-194

Lincoln Memorial

Struggle

148-194

Mississippi College

n/a

148-194

New England

Perish

148-194

North Carolina Central

n/a

148-194

Northern Kentucky

n/a

148-194

Nova Southeastern

Perish

148-194

Ohio Northern

n/a

148-194

Oklahoma City

Struggle

148-194

Regent

Struggle

148-194

Roger Williams

n/a

148-194

Samford

Struggle

148-194

Southern Illinois

Struggle

148-194

Southern University

n/a

148-194

South Texas

n/a

148-194

Southwestern

Struggle

148-194

St. Mary's

n/a

148-194

St. Thomas (FL)

n/a

148-194

Texas Southern

n/a

148-194

Touro College

n/a

148-194

Arkansas-Little Rock

n/a

148-194

Detroit Mercy

Perish

148-194

Massachusetts-Dartmouth

Perish

148-194

North Dakota

Survive

148-194

San Francisco

Survive

148-194

University of DC

n/a

148-194

Pacific

Perish

148-194

Western Michigan

Survive

148-194

Western New England

Struggle

148-194

Western State

n/a

148-194

Widener-Delaware

Struggle

148-194

Widener-Pennsylvania

Struggle

148-194

Inter-American

n/a

148-194

Pontifical Catholic

n/a

148-194

North Texas-Dallas

Survive

148-194

Puerto Rico

n/a

Posted by James Phillips on July 28, 2020 at 04:59 PM in Entry Level Hiring Report, Life of Law Schools, Teaching Law | Permalink | Comments (8)

Monday, June 01, 2020

The Initially-Foreign-Trained Law Student and the Legal Academic Job Market - Lubin Guest Post

The following is a guest post by Asaf Lubin.

For those considering a career in legal academia, these are uncertain times. The Association of American Law Schools has recently decided to cancel its 2020 Fall Faculty Recruitment Conference due to COVID-19. Instead, law schools are now invited to rely on the Faculty Appointments Register (FAR) to reach out directly to candidates for scheduling what will most likely be online interviews. Of course, it remains to be seen how many law schools will actually hire next year as “pay cuts, salary freezes, and furloughs are hitting law schools” across the country.

As we look to examine the long-lasting impacts of COVID-19 on the legal academic job market, one category of candidates deserves our special attention. Initially-Foreign-Trained Law Students (IFT or IFTs) on the market have faced unique challenges that have mostly gone unvoiced. While battling visa issues and the emotional and financial costs of relocating a family, this group of candidates also had to endure various forms of explicit and implicit bias. These adversities, and others, make what is already an uphill climb––trying to succeed in a highly competitive buyers’ market––seem insurmountable. Especially at this time, as the growing unemployment numbers due to the coronavirus are triggering a general isolationist sentiment centered on preserving American jobs for American workers, the challenges for IFTs loom larger. This sentiment is one shared by the current administration. President Trump recently signed a “Proclamation Suspending Entry of Immigrants Who Present Risk to the U.S. Labor Market During the Economic Recovery Following the COVID-19 Outbreak.” According to some reports, Trump is expected to only broaden and tighten these foreign worker bans and restrictions, as pressure from conservative lobbying groups to do so intensifies.

Thanks to the dedicated work of Sarah Lawsky, who through this blog annually compiles information and produces reports about entry-level hires, we now have a decade of data easily accessible to us. I therefore set out to explore what the numbers have to say about IFT hires. Given that there are few resources available that exclusively target this group of market goers, the short essay I wrote provides some initial insight into their professional and geographical backgrounds and academic interests as well as offers some general advice.

Full disclosure: I am an IFT who went on the academic job market this fall and recently accepted a position as a tenure track associate professor at Indiana University Maurer School of Law. I am therefore in a good position to tell this story as I have just lived it. Nonetheless, I am also consciously aware that my experience is anecdotal and that the number of IFT hires each year is so small that extrapolating actual trends from them is quite difficult. I am also aware of my own implicit biases as a white cis-gender Jewish Israeli-Polish gay man. IFTs on the market have varied cultural, ethnic, and socio-economic backgrounds and life experiences that I cannot fully capture or aim to represent. I therefore hope that by writing this piece I can encourage others to share their story.

The abstract of the paper is provided in full below. The paper is accessible on SSRN. I welcome any thoughts, feedback, or critique at [email protected].

To be a foreigner in a new country is never easy. Cultural shock and language barriers present an array of obstacles for the incoming individual. Being a foreign law student adds new layers of difficulty as you’re called to learn a completely new legal system in a short period of time. For some, real acclimation to an American law school and to American legal practice, would come at the expense of foregoing a great deal of what it meant to be a lawyer back home.

Initially-foreign-trained law students (IFTs) will undergo many “trials and tribulations of adjustment”, as Professor Damaška once described them, but none are greater than those that await them at the end of the line, if they choose to enter the U.S. legal academic job market.

This short essay offers a first account of the unique experiences that await IFTs on the market. Relying on extensive data accessible through Professor Sarah Lawsky’s Entry Level Hiring Report it offers IFT-specific statistical findings drawn from the past decade of law school hiring. The essay tries to explore a number of relevant points of comparison: (a) the general success rate of IFTs on the market; (b) the geographical origins of IFT hires; (c) their research and teaching areas of interests; and (d) their professional backgrounds.

Given that there are currently no available resources that are tailored to the unique experiences of IFTs, the essay aims to fill this gap by providing some brief insight as to the employability of contemporary IFT students. The essay further contains a few modest suggestions, based on the data, for future IFT students who might be considering a career as law professors in the U.S.

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on June 1, 2020 at 11:00 AM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, May 27, 2020

Entry Level Hiring - JD School Total and Over Time

Responding to a question posted on Facebook:

Source of JD by hiring school, total, by percent. This is drawn from the Entry Level Hiring Reports from 2011 to 2020.

JD School Total

Yale 17%, Harvard 15%, NYU 9%, Stanford 6%, Columbia 5%, Chicago 5%, Michigan 4%, Berkeley 4%, Georgetown 3%, Virginia 2%, Duke 2%, Northwestern 2%, Penn 1%, Cornell 1%, Hebrew University 1%, fewer than 1% of hires 22%.

The three schools with the most hires are, obviously, Yale, Harvard, and NYU. Looking more closely at those three schools over time:

JDHYNYU

YHNYUChart

As always, I am happy to work with anyone who would be interested in pursuing these or other questions further. Or people should of course feel free to use the data themselves (with the caveat that the numbers from the public spreadsheets may not match the numbers above, as some people have asked not to be posted on the spreadsheets but have given me permission to include them in the data).

This post is freely available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 license, cited as Sarah Lawsky, Entry Level Hiring - JD School Total and Over Time, https://prawfsblawg.blogs.com/prawfsblawg/2020/05/entry-level-hiring-jd-school-total-and-over-time.html.

 

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on May 27, 2020 at 06:31 AM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (1)

Friday, May 15, 2020

Spring Reported Entry Level Hiring Report 2020

Following is a data summary of the Spring Reported Entry Level Hiring Report for 2020. To remain consistent with past years, while the spreadsheet contains all hiring information received, the data analysis includes only tenure-track hires at U.S. law schools. (The data analysis also includes several hires who requested not to be included in the spreadsheet at the date of this posting.)

This report and the spreadsheet are freely available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 license, cited as Sarah Lawsky, Spring Reported Entry Level Hiring Report 2020, PrawfsBlawg, https://prawfsblawg.blogs.com/prawfsblawg/2020/05/spring-reported-entry-level-hiring-report-2020-1.html.

Here is the full spreadsheet:

There were 88 tenure-track hires at U.S. law schools reported, at 66 different law schools.

Q: How does 88 reported hires compare to past years?

It appears that we hit the “new normal” in 2014 and have seen fluctuations from around that level since then. The average number of hires per year since 2014 is 76. (I omit 2010 in this and all subsequent cross-year comparisons because insufficient data was collected that year.)

01 Reported Hires

It would useful to know the percentage of those who registered with the AALS who got jobs. While the AALS does not provide that information, the number of forms in the first distribution of FAR AALS forms is not a terrible proxy. This graph and chart compares the hiring in Year X to the number of forms in the first distribution in Year (X - 1) (because those are the people who were hired in Year X). Reported hires per FAR form is essentially the same as last year.

Image002

Hires per FAR Chart

Q: You say the hires were at 66 different schools. How does that compare to previous years?

The number of schools hiring was somewhat higher than, though still comparable to, previous years since 2014.

Schools Hiring

Hires per school per year may also be of interest:


Hires per School

Q: How many reported hires got their JD from School X?

JD From

Yale 19; Harvard 12; Stanford 9; NYU 6; Hebrew University 5; Berkeley 5; Chicago 4; Georgetown 3; Michigan 3.

Schools in the “fewer than three hires” category with two JD/LLBs who reported hires: Columbia, Hamline, Northwestern.

Schools in the “fewer than three hires” category with one JD/LLB who reported hires: Arizona State, George Washington, Hastings, Illinois, McGill, Miami, Minnesota, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Temple, Texas, Tsinghua, Washington & Lee.

This information comes with two related caveats.

First, the spreadsheet reports the number of hires who received a JD from a particular school who accepted a tenure-track job, but not the number of JDs on the market who received a tenure-track job offer.

Second, the spreadsheet reports the count of JDs from a particular school, but not the rate at which JDs received (or accepted) offers. A smaller school with a high placement rate thus might not appear on the chart, whereas a larger program with a low placement rate might appear. This caveat means that smaller schools may be undervalued if one relies only on this data, while larger schools might be overvalued. 

Q: How many reported hires had a fellowship, degree, or clerkship?

73 (about 83%) had a fellowship; 51 (about 58%) had a clerkship; 67 (about 76%) had a higher degree. One reported hire did not have any of these credentials.

Venn diagram:

Venn

Comparing two categories of the Venn diagram related to fellowships, degrees, and clerkships--hires that have all three credentials, and hires that have none of the credentials--a shift starting in 2017 is apparent:

Venn Compare

Q: Still a lot of fellowships.

A: Yes, the rate of fellowships remains high.

Fellowship Rate

Q: From what law schools  did people get these fellowships?

I count here any law school at which a person reports having a fellowship. So one person could account for two schools’ being listed here. For example, if a single individual had a fellowship at Columbia followed by a fellowship at NYU, that would be reflected below as +1 to Columbia and +1 to NYU.

Fellowship School

Harvard 14; NYU 11; Stanford 9; Chicago 5; Columbia 5; American Bar Foundation 4; Penn 3; Fewer than Three 42.

This information comes with the same two caveats as the JD numbers.

First, the spreadsheet reports the number of hires who received a fellowship from a particular school who accepted a tenure-track job, but not the number of fellows who received a tenure-track job offer. This caveat likely applies to all or nearly all fellowship programs. Presumably, someone choosing between fellowships cares more about how many people received tenure-track job offers than about how many people accepted those offers.

Second, the spreadsheet reports the count of fellows, but not the rate at which fellows received (or accepted) offers. A smaller program with a high placement rate thus might not appear on the chart, whereas a larger program with a low placement rate might appear. This caveat means that smaller programs may be undervalued if one relies only on this data, while larger programs might be overvalued.

Q: Tell me more about these advanced degrees. 

Okay, but first a caveat: Although some people had more than one advanced degree, the following looks only at what seemed to me to be the "highest" degree someone earned. For example, someone with a Ph.D. and an LL.M. would be counted only as a Ph.D. for purposes of this question. (This tracks the "Other Degree (1)" column.)

That said, looking only at what seemed to be the most advanced degree, and including expected degrees, the 67 “highest” advanced degrees broke down like this:

Highest Degree

Doctorate (Ph.D., SJD, JSD, D.Phil.) 43; Masters 15; LL.M. 6; MBA 2; MD 1.

Topics ranged all over the map. For the 43 Doctorates, 9 had degrees in Law; 6 in Political Science (including Politics & International Studies), 5 in Economics (including Business Economics and Development Economics), 5 in JSP, 3 in Anthropology, 2 in each of Environment/Environmental Science & Policy, History, Philosophy, and Sociology; and the other doctorate topics, each of which had only one hire, were Criminology, Law & Society; Geography; History and Philosophy of Science; International Relations; Justice Studies; Literacy, Culture & International Education; Psychology.

Q: What is the percentage of doctorates over time?

This year continued the now four-year trend of a 40% or higher percentage of reported hires with doctorates.

Doctorate Time

Q: Commenters wondered whether there were more JSD/SJDs among the hires this year. Were there?

There were a few more JSD/SJDs than usual, but nothing too anomalous; the average is 4.1. There were 7 reported JSD/SJD hires this year; there were 6 in 2013.

SJD JSD

Q: That's a lot of doctorates, and that goes along with a lot of fellowships! How many people had a doctorate, or a fellowship, or both?

92% of the reported hires had either a doctorate, a fellowship, or both.

Doctorate Fellowship

Q: How long ago did these reported hires get their initial law degrees?

Year of JD

Zero to Four Years (Graduated 2016-2020) 8; Five to Nine Years (Graduated 2011-2015) 53; Ten to 19 Years (Graduated 2001-2010) 24; Twenty or More Years (Graduated before 2001) 3.

Q: How do the "time since initial degree" numbers compare to previous years?

This is very similar to previous years. There are somewhat fewer people who graduated zero to four years ago than usual, and correspondingly more people who graduated five to nine years ago, but a similar distribution was seen in some previous years.

Years JD Time

Years JD Time Chart


Q: Could you break the reported hires out by men/women?

Men Women

Men 51 (58%); women 37 (42%). (Let’s say this is right within +/-2 people.)

Based on a quick count of a number of years of spreadsheets that I happen to have, gender hiring over time follows. (I’ve left out the data labels because I am even less sure than usual of the exactness of the numbers, but they’re roughly right as reflections of self-reported hiring each spring—first Solum’s reports, then mine. And as always, 2010 is left out due to missing data for that year.) 

Gender Time

Q: More slicing! More dicing! Different slicing! Different dicing!

Sure--you can do it yourself, or ask questions in the comments and I'll see what I can do, or we'll work it out as a group.

Q: This is all wrong! I know for a fact that more people from School Y were hired!

Yes, this spreadsheet is certainly missing some information. Repeat: this spreadsheet is incomplete. It represents only those entry-level hires that were reported to me, either through the comments on this blog or via email. It is without question incomplete. 

If you want to know about real entry level hiring, I commend to you Brian Leiter's report (hiring 1995-2011), the Katz et al. article (all law professors as of 2008), the George and Yoon article (entry level, 2007-2008 hiring year), and the Tsesis Report (entry level, 2012-2013 hiring year). This is just a report about self-reported entry level hires as of the spring before the school year starts. 

Q: Is this available in an easy-to-print format?

A: I am waiting until the report is more finalized to put up the easy-to-print format; I will probably add it in June.

Originally posted 5/15/2020; edited 5/17/20 to add one hire; edited 5/21/20 to add one hire and remove the PDF report, to be added back in June; edited 5/27/20 to add one person and to clean up fellowship/doctorate graph to reflect percentages of all hires, instead of just doctrinal hires, for consistency with other portions of the report.

 

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on May 15, 2020 at 12:00 PM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (34)

Monday, March 23, 2020

Entry Level Hiring: The 2020 Report - Second Call for Information

In the larger scheme of things right now, this report is, of course, trivial compared to what is happening right now around the world. After much consideration, I will nonetheless continue to compile the data and create the report, as a way of saying, to myself and others, that what we are all experiencing right now will end, and this year's report will both follow and precede many other reports. That is, I continue with the report this year as an act of optimism, not of denial.

This a reminder of the Entry Level Hiring Report.

If you have information about entry-level hires for this year, please either email me directly (sarah *dot* lawsky *at* law *dot* northwestern *dot* edu), or add a comment to the original information-gathering post.

Please encourage anyone you know who has accepted a job but isn't reflected on the spreadsheet to contact me.

As a reminder, I am looking to collect the following information for tenure-track, clinical, or legal writing full-time entry-level hires: 

Basic Information: Name, Hiring School, JD Institution, JD Year of Graduation

Other Degrees: Type of Degree,  Degree Granting Institution, Degree Subject

Fellowship, VAP, or Visiting Professorship: Institution and Type (e.g., VAP, name of fellowship, etc.)

Clerkship: Court (e.g., 9th Circuit, Texas Supreme Court, etc.)

Areas of Speciality (up to four) (if you are a clinical or LRW hire, please list this as your first Area of Specialty)

Type of Position: Tenure Track or Non-Tenure Track (if you are clinical or LRW and also tenure-track, please indicate this)

(Comments are closed on this post in order to drive comments to the original post.)

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on March 23, 2020 at 11:57 AM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, March 02, 2020

Entry Level Hiring: The 2020 Report - Call for Information

Time once again for the entry level hiring report.

I will gather the following information for tenure-track, clinical, or legal writing full-time entry-level hires: 

Basic Information: Name, Hiring School, JD Institution, JD Year of Graduation

Other Degrees: Type of Degree,  Degree Granting Institution, Degree Subject

Fellowship, VAP, or Visiting Professorship: Institution and Type (e.g., VAP, name of fellowship, etc.)

Clerkship: Court (e.g., 9th Circuit, Texas Supreme Court, etc.)

Areas of Speciality (up to four) (if you are a clinical or LRW hire, please list this as your first Area of Specialty)

Type of Position: Tenure Track or Non-Tenure Track (if you are clinical or LRW and also tenure-track, please indicate this)

The information will be aggregated on this spreadsheet (which is reproduced below and which you can view and download by clicking on this link); scroll across to see all of the information that will be aggregated.

Please leave the information in the comments, and, to protect those on the job market, please sign the comment with your real name. (Ideally, the reporting person would be either the hired individual or someone from the hiring committee at the hiring school.) If you would like to email information instead of posting it, please send it to Sarah Lawsky at sarah *dot* lawsky *at* law *dot* northwestern *dot* edu. Remember: you can't edit the spreadsheet yourself. To get your information into the spreadsheet, you must either post in the comments or email me.

If you see any errors, or if I have incorporated your information into the spreadsheet but you are not yet ready to make it public, please don't hesitate to email me, and I will take care of the problem as soon as I can.

Clarifications:

The list does not include people who were full-time non-tenure track clinicians who are now moving to a tenure track job at a different school, as these don't seem like true entry-level hires to me. This is the situation where a person is at a school that does not provide tenure to clinicians, and then moves to a school that does provide tenure to clinicians.

The list does include people who had a non-professor job in a law school and then moved to a professor job that was tenure track. Thus a person may have worked at a law school for many years, but still be considered an entry level hire. To indicate this situation, I will put their previous job at a law school in the "fellowship" category, and note "non-TT to TT" in the "Notes" category. This is not to indicate that this isn't an entry-level hire, but rather to give information about the nature of the item listed as a fellowship. (I.e., not a temporary position, as fellowships usually are.)

Other links:

This report follows in the tradition of Larry Solum's excellent work over many years.

2019 initial post, 2019 spreadsheet, 2019 report (with graphs).

2018 initial post, 2018 spreadsheet, 2018 report (with graphs).

2017 initial post, 2017 spreadsheet, 2017 report (with graphs).

2016 initial post, 2016 spreadsheet, 2016 report (with graphs). 

2015 initial post, 2015 spreadsheet, 2015 report (with graphs).

2014 initial post, 2014 spreadsheet, 2014 report (with graphs).

2013 initial post, 2013 spreadsheet, 2013 report (with graphs).

2012 initial post, 2012 spreadsheet, 2012 report (with graphs).

2011 initial post, 2011 spreadsheet, 2011 report (with graphs).

All PrawfsBlawg entry level hiring report tagged posts.

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on March 2, 2020 at 01:30 PM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (26)

Monday, December 16, 2019

Reported Entry Level Hiring 2020 - Spreadsheet

Here is the spreadsheet for 2020 entry-level hiring. This information is drawn from what seemed to be public postings (for example, tweets) that announced entry-level hires. I have included the link to the relevant public source (for example, the tweet announcing the hiring).

As always, if you are the person listed and would like the entry changed or removed, just send me an email and I will immediately change or remove the listing.

I'm happy to add other reports of hires anytime, if people want to email me with their own information (or if someone wants to point me toward a public source for the information, such as a tweet or announcement by a school); in addition, the usual call for information will be posted in early March.

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on December 16, 2019 at 09:30 AM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (13)

Tuesday, July 16, 2019

AALS on Entry Level Hiring

Update, 7/16/19: I have been directly in touch with AALS, and they were extremely willing to update the site. I am going to leave this post up, because I'm generally opposed to putting things down the memory hole, but I will close comments.

I have long hoped that the AALS would report on entry-level hiring. After all, they are the ones who collect all the information. They are well positioned to do true statistical analysis on the candidate pool and the successful candidates. (They used to do so but stopped for some reason and scrubbed the information from the website, though of course it's available through the Wayback Machine.)

So I was happy to see that they have created a new website, which will, they promise, "mak[e] the process of obtaining a teaching job as transparent as possible, and provid[e] as much information to potential candidates as we can."

Imagine my surprise when I clicked through to the website and found, not statistical analysis based on actual information to which they have direct access, but rather the data and graphs that I, Sarah Lawsky, have been posting on this blog for the past ten years. My work is acknowledged through a single asterisk, which leads to this text at the bottom of the page: These data, which are self-reported by recently hired law faculty or, in some cases, their schools, was collected by PrawfsBlawg and provided as a downloadable spreadsheet. PrawfsBlawg data include “information for tenure-track, clinical, or legal writing full-time entry level hires.” (There is a link to the spreadsheet through the words "downloadable spreadsheet," but there's no formatting to indicate it's a link.)

To be clear: I want people to use this data. That's why I make it downloadable. But it would be nice if AALS would name me, because PrawfsBlawg does not actually collect anything: it's a website. And it would be nice if they link to the website, as well as to the data. It would have been really nice if they had reached out first to talk to me about the data, using it, and perhaps even collaborating, but I guess I understand why they didn't(?).

I've sent an email to AALS, and I hope they make changes to their webpage. More importantly, I really, really hope that instead of just taking self-reported hiring information, they use their vast store of information and give us accurate information about the pool of potential hires, the success rates of various groups, and so forth. They are uniquely positioned to do so.

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on July 16, 2019 at 12:17 PM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (6)

Saturday, June 08, 2019

Spring Self-Reported Entry Level Hiring Report 2019: Years Since Graduation - School Rank

On Twitter, Matthew Bruckner: "This was the first time I've noticed that the "too much practice experience is bad"-trope does not seem grounded in the data."

Lawprawfblawg: "Is it distributed evenly across schools, or does the trope apply to a greater degree depending on ranking?"

Matthew Bruckner: [Power Rangers Shrug .gif]

The following looks at all tenure-track hiring that's been reported to the entry-level report since 2011, inclusive. Years since graduation will provide a rough proxy for practice experience (though given the rise of fellowships and PhDs, not to mention clerkships, many hires have significantly fewer years of practice experience than they do years since graduation--that is, some number of years since graduation will, for many people, have been spent clerking, doing fellowships, getting other degrees, etc.)

That said, there do appear to be some real differences in years since graduation depending on rank of school. For example, while hires with 20 or more years since graduation are relatively uncommon in general, Top 14 schools have no reported hires of someone with 20 or more years since graduation during these years. Additionally, Top 14 schools are much more likely to hire someone with zero to 4 years since graduation than are other ranks.

Years Since Grad Rank Bar.20190608

Years Since Grad Rank Chart.20190608

Years Since Grad Rank Chart Count.20190608

The usual caveats regarding school rank apply. Rankings are deeply problematic. In the categories above, T30 means "Top 30 but not Top 14 or Top 20," etc. I was very expansive in categories, so, for example, in my list, more schools than 14 are in the T14; more schools than 30 are T14 + T20 + T30; etc. My list of law schools with ranking categories (which I drew loosely from the US News rankings, keeping in mind that the US news rankings are very stable over time) is available here. I'm sure one can quibble around the edges that a particular school should be higher or lower ranked, but moving a school or two shouldn't change the overall general sense above. 

Edited 6/8/19 to clarify that the information relates to years since graduation, not practice experience.

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on June 8, 2019 at 11:58 PM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (2)

Thursday, June 06, 2019

Spring Self-Reported Entry Level Hiring Report 2019: Doctrinal, Fellowship, Doctorate

Jessica Erickson proposes looking at doctrinal hires with either a doctorate or a fellowship (or both). As she explains in the comments to the main post:

I was interested to know the percentage of doctrinal (aka podium*) hires at U.S. law schools this past year who have a Ph.D. or SJD and/or have done a fellowship/VAP. This is slightly different than the Venn diagram...because (i) it does not include other types of advanced degrees, such as an LLM or Master’s degree, and (ii) it only includes doctrinal tenure-track hires, not clinical or LRW hires. I am also not including clerkships in this count because I don’t think that they serve the same function as a Ph.D./SJD or fellowship/VAP program....

*There isn’t a good term for this category of faculty, especially as I fully recognize that all faculty teach legal doctrine and few faculty always teach behind a podium. My point is simply that VAPs and fellowships are not as much of a required hurdle for faculty who want to teach in a clinic or legal writing program, so I wanted to focus on the particular category of faculty for whom this is the standard path. 

As Jessica suggests, this category (doctrinal + or(doctorate, fellowship)) includes almost every hire these days, and the percentage with these characteristics, while always high, has increased over time (click on chart for larger version):

Doctrinal Fellowship Doctorate.20190606

Doctrinal Fellowship Doctorate Chart.20190606

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on June 6, 2019 at 04:44 PM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, June 05, 2019

Spring Self-Reported Entry Level Hiring Report 2019: Venn Over Time

A commenter on the main entry level hiring report drew attention to the fact that no reported entry level hires this year have no fellowship, clerkship, or advanced degree. It struck me that it might be interesting to look over time at two categories of the Venn diagram related to fellowships, degrees, and clerkships: hires that have all three credentials, and hires that have none of the credentials.

Fellowships Clerkship Advanced Degree.20190605
Fellowships Clerkship Advanced Degree.20190605

As the commenter suggested, there does appear to have been a shift in each of these two groups over time.

 

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on June 5, 2019 at 10:23 AM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (2)

Tuesday, June 04, 2019

Spring Self-Reported Entry Level Hiring Report 2019

Following is a data summary of the Spring Self-Reported Entry Level Hiring Report for 2019. To remain consistent with past years, while the spreadsheet contains all hiring information received, the data analysis includes only tenure-track hires at U.S. law schools. (The data analysis also includes several hires who requested not to be included in the spreadsheet at the date of this posting, although the people will eventually be included in the spreadsheet.) 

Here is the full spreadsheet:

The data includes 82 tenure-track hires at U.S. law schools, at 60 different law schools.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions:

Q: How does 81 reported hires compare to past years?

A: Quite similar. It appears that we hit the “new normal” in 2014 and have seen fluctuations from around that level since then. The average number of hires per year since 2014 is 74. (I omit 2010 in this and all subsequent cross-year comparisons because insufficient data was collected that year.)

Reported Hires.20190618

The ratio of hires to first-round FAR forms is up slightly (click chart for bigger version):

Hires per FAR.20190618

Hires per FAR Chart.20190618

Q: You say the hires were at 59 different schools. How does that compare to previous years?

A: The number of schools hiring was comparable to previous years since 2014.

Schools Hiring.20190618

Hires per school per year may also be of interest:

Hires per School.20190618

Q: How many reported hires got their JD from School X?

JD From

Yale 12; Harvard 11; NYU 7; Stanford 7; Michigan 6; Chicago 5; Berkeley 3; Vanderbilt 3; Virginia 3.

Schools in the “fewer than three hires” category with two JD/LLBs who reported hires: Boston University, Columbia, Georgetown, Northwestern.

Schools in the “fewer than three hires” category with one JD/LLB who reported hires: Arizona, Arkansas-Fayetteville, Cornell, DePaul, Duke, East China University, Haifa, Hamburg, Kansas, Penn, Pontifical Catholic, Rutgers, Seoul Nat'l U, Tel Aviv, UCLA, Washington & Lee, Washington (St. Louis).

This information comes with two related caveats.

First, the spreadsheet reports the number of hires who received a JD from a particular school who accepted a tenure-track job, but not the number of JDs on the market who received a tenure-track job offer.

Second, the spreadsheet reports the count of JDs from a particular school, but not the rate at which JDs received (or accepted) offers. A smaller school with a high placement rate thus might not appear on the chart, whereas a larger program with a low placement rate might appear. This caveat means that smaller schools may be undervalued if one relies only on this data, while larger schools might be overvalued. 

Q: How many reported hires had a fellowship, degree, or clerkship?

64 (about 78%) had a fellowship; 51 (about 63%) had a clerkship; 54 (about 66%) had a higher degree. Every reported hire had at least one of these credentials.

Venn diagram:

Venn.20190618

Q: Still a lot of fellowships.

A: Yes, the rate of fellowships remains high.

Fellowships.20190610

Q: From what law schools  did people get these fellowships?

I count here any law school at which a person reports having a fellowship. So one person could account for two schools’ being listed here. For example, if a single individual had a fellowship at Columbia followed by a fellowship at NYU, that would be reflected below as +1 to Columbia and +1 to NYU.

Fellowship School.20190618

NYU 14; Columbia 8; Harvard 7; Yale 6; Chicago 5; Stanford 5; Berkeley 4; Penn 3; Virginia 4; Fewer than Three 24.

This information comes with the same two caveats as the JD numbers.

First, the spreadsheet reports the number of hires who received a fellowship from a particular school who accepted a tenure-track job, but not the number of fellows who received a tenure-track job offer. This caveat likely applies to all or nearly all fellowship programs. Presumably, someone choosing between fellowships cares more about how many people received tenure-track job offers than about how many people accepted those offers.

Second, the spreadsheet reports the count of fellows, but not the rate at which fellows received (or accepted) offers. A smaller program with a high placement rate thus might not appear on the chart, whereas a larger program with a low placement rate might appear. This caveat means that smaller programs may be undervalued if one relies only on this data, while larger programs might be overvalued.

Q: Tell me more about these advanced degrees. 

Okay, but first a caveat: Although some people had more than one advanced degree, the following looks only at what seemed to me to be the "highest" degree someone earned. For example, someone with a Ph.D. and an LL.M. would be counted only as a Ph.D. for purposes of this question. (This tracks the "Other Degree (1)" column.)

That said, looking only at what seemed to be the most advanced degree, and including expected degrees, the 52 "highest" advanced degrees broke down like this:

Highest Degree.20190618

Doctorate (Ph.D., SJD, JSD, D.Phil.) 41; Masters 9; LL.M. 2; MBA 1; MD 1.

Topics ranged all over the map. For the 41 Doctorates, 8 had degrees in Law; 3 in Economics, 3 in History, 3 in Philosophy, 3 in Political Science, 3 in Sociology; 2 in Politics; and the other doctorate topics, each of which had only hire, were African-American Studies, Anthropology, Business & Public Policy, Corporate Law, Criminology, Ecology, Empirical Legal Studies, Government, International Relations, Law & Econ, Legal History, Managerial Econ & Strategy, Mgmt Sci & Engineering, Modern Thought & Literature, Religious Studies, Rhetoric.

Q: What is the percentage of doctorates over time?

There are a notably higher percentage of doctorates over the last three years. It will be interesting to see whether this trend continues.

Percent Doctorate.20190610

Q: How long ago did these reported hires get their initial law degrees?

Year JD.20190618

Zero to Four Years (Graduated 2015-2019) 19; Five to Nine Years (Graduated 2010-2014) 34; Ten to 19 Years (Graduated 2000-2009) 28; Twenty or More Years (Graduated before 2000) 1.

Q: How do the "time since initial degree" numbers compare to previous years?

A: They are very similar.

Years Since JD Chart.20190618

Q: Could you break the reported hires out by men/women?

Men Women.20190618

Men 50 (61%); women 32 (39%). (Let’s say this is right within +/-2 people.)

Based on a quick count of a number of years of spreadsheets that I happen to have, gender hiring over time follows. (I’ve left out the data labels because I am even less sure than usual of the exactness of the numbers, but they’re roughly right as reflections of self-reported hiring each spring—first Solum’s reports, then mine. And as always, 2010 is left out due to missing data for that year.) 

Gender Percent.20190618

Q: More slicing! More dicing! Different slicing! Different dicing!

Sure--you can do it yourself, or ask questions in the comments and I'll see what I can do, or we'll work it out as a group.

Q: This is all wrong! I know for a fact that more people from School Y were hired!

Yes, this spreadsheet is certainly missing some information. Repeat: this spreadsheet is incomplete. It represents only those entry-level hires that were reported to me, either through the comments on this blog or via email. It is without question incomplete. 

If you want to know about real entry level hiring, I commend to you Brian Leiter's report (hiring 1995-2011), the Katz et al. article (all law professors as of 2008), the George and Yoon article (entry level, 2007-2008 hiring year), and the Tsesis Report (entry level, 2012-2013 hiring year). This is just a report about self-reported entry level hires as of the spring before the school year starts. 

Q: Is this available in an easy-to-print format?

A: Why, as it happens, yes!

Originally posted 6/5/19; updated 6/10/19, 6/13/19, 6/18/19 to reflect one additional hire each time.

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on June 4, 2019 at 04:03 PM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (8)

Monday, March 04, 2019

Entry Level Hiring: The 2019 Report - Call for Information

Time once again for the entry level hiring report.

I will gather the following information for tenure-track, clinical, or legal writing full-time entry-level hires: 

Basic Information: Name, Hiring School, JD Institution, JD Year of Graduation

Other Degrees: Type of Degree,  Degree Granting Institution, Degree Subject

Fellowship, VAP, or Visiting Professorship: Institution and Type (e.g., VAP, name of fellowship, etc.)

Clerkship: Court (e.g., 9th Circuit, Texas Supreme Court, etc.)

Areas of Speciality (up to four) (if you are a clinical or LRW hire, please list this as your first Area of Specialty)

Type of Position: Tenure Track or Non-Tenure Track (if you are clinical or LRW and also tenure-track, please indicate this)

The information will be aggregated on this spreadsheet (which is reproduced below and which you can view and download by clicking on this link); scroll across to see all of the information that will be aggregated.

Please leave the information in the comments, and, to protect those on the job market, please sign the comment with your real name. (Ideally, the reporting person would be either the hired individual or someone from the hiring committee at the hiring school.) If you would like to email information instead of posting it, please send it to Sarah Lawsky at sarah *dot* lawsky *at* law *dot* northwestern *dot* edu. Remember: you can't edit the spreadsheet yourself. To get your information into the spreadsheet, you must either post in the comments or email me.

If you see any errors, or if I have incorporated your information into the spreadsheet but you are not yet ready to make it public, please don't hesitate to email me, and I will take care of the problem as soon as I can.

Clarifications:

The list does not include people who were full-time non-tenure track clinicians who are now moving to a tenure track job at a different school, as these don't seem like true entry-level hires to me. This is the situation where a person is at a school that does not provide tenure to clinicians, and then moves to a school that does provide tenure to clinicians.

The list does include people who had a non-professor job in a law school and then moved to a professor job that was tenure track. Thus a person may have worked at a law school for many years, but still be considered an entry level hire. To indicate this situation, I will put their previous job at a law school in the "fellowship" category, and note "non-TT to TT" in the "Notes" category. This is not to indicate that this isn't an entry-level hire, but rather to give information about the nature of the item listed as a fellowship. (I.e., not a temporary position, as fellowships usually are.)

Other links:

This report follows in the tradition of Larry Solum's excellent work over many years.

2018 initial post, 2018 spreadsheet, 2018 report (with graphs).

2017 initial post, 2017 spreadsheet, 2017 report (with graphs).

2016 initial post, 2016 spreadsheet, 2016 report (with graphs). 

2015 initial post, 2015 spreadsheet, 2015 report (with graphs).

2014 initial post, 2014 spreadsheet, 2014 report (with graphs).

2013 initial post, 2013 spreadsheet, 2013 report (with graphs).

2012 initial post, 2012 spreadsheet, 2012 report (with graphs).

2011 initial post, 2011 spreadsheet, 2011 report (with graphs).

All PrawfsBlawg entry level hiring report tagged posts.

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on March 4, 2019 at 10:00 AM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (42)

Thursday, May 24, 2018

Who Stopped Hiring?

In 2011, 155 entry-level law professors were hired. In 2018, 76 entry-level law professors were hired. Who stopped hiring?

The answer is perhaps not surprising: lower-ranked law schools. In the top 30 (very loosely defined to include many more than 30 law schools), hiring remained steady. In the lower-ranked law schools, hiring dropped off significantly.

Hires by Ranking.20180524
Hires by Ranking.20180524

The key jumps to look at are 2012 to 2013, and then again 2013 to 2014.

Here's another way to look at it: in 2011, schools in the top 30 and above represented 23% of the law schools overall, and did 30% of the hiring. In 2018, those same schools did 45% of the hiring. (And some years it was even starker: in 2016, those schools did 53% of the hiring.)

Schools Grouped Hiring.20180524

My list of law schools with ranking categories (which I drew loosely from the US News rankings this year, keeping in mind that the US news rankings are very stable over time) is available here. I'm sure one can quibble around the edges that a particular school should be higher or lower ranked, but moving a school or two shouldn't change the overall result above.

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on May 24, 2018 at 05:23 PM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (1)

Wednesday, May 23, 2018

2018 Hiring Report - Subject Areas Over Time

Jeremy Bearer-Friend commented: "I wonder whether there are certain patterns over time for entry-level hiring by area of law. For example, whether tax hiring is constant even when total number of hires dips, or whether civ pro is generally 20% of the hires each year, etc. Some categories may be more consistently coded over time so this could be tricky to do but thought worth asking!"

I went through and cleaned up the data a little so that the categories were consistently coded over time and then did a cross-year comparison of hiring areas. Results follow. Note that these are the results for U.S., tenure track hires only--the same group on which I usually run the data aggregation.

Each year, candidates can list between zero and four subject areas in which they work. (In 2011 they were allowed to list a maximum of three; in all other years, a maximum of four.) 

First, I looked at all subject areas ("All Areas") that candidates listed in a given year. For example, if Candidate A listed "Tax, Con Law, Civ Pro" (interesting candidate!), then this person would be responsible for three entries in the below compilation. As you can see, Crim and Civ Pro lead the pack each year. Other 1L subjects are also very popular. (Click for bigger graphics.)

All Subject Areas Count.20180523
All Subject Areas Count.20180523
All Subject Areas Count.20180523

I did not see any areas where the raw number of hires stayed fixed across time, though the percentage of hires did seem to remain roughly steady.

Second, I looked at just Area 1 -- that is, the subject area that the candidate listed first. So, for example, Candidate A, our "Tax, Con Law, Civ Pro" candidate, would be responsible for only one entry on in this compilation: Tax. This might represent the person's main area of interest. The results were similar here. (Click for bigger graphics.)

Area 1 Count.20180523
Area 1 Count.20180523
Area 1 Count.20180523

Below the fold, a list of every subject area listed in any year. And for those of you who really want to play around with this, here is a link to the raw data, cleaned up a little. It is yearning for more pivot charts.

All Areas, All Years

Academic Success

Accounting

Admin

Admiralty

Advertising

Agency & Partnership

Agricultural

American Indian Law

American Legal History

Antidiscrimination Law

Antitrust

Appellate Practice

Arbitration

Arctic Law

Art Law

Banking

Banking

Bankruptcy

Behavioral Law & Econ

Bioethics

Biotech

British Legal History

Bus Orgs

Business Ethics

Business Law

Business Reorgs

Capital Markets Regulation

CED

Child/Family & State

Chinese Law

Civ Pro

Civil Litigation

Civil Rights

Civil/Comparative Law

Climate Change

Clinical

Collateral Consequences

Commercial Arbitration

Commercial Law

Community Property

Comparative Con Law

Comparative Law

Complex Litigation

Con Law

Conflicts of Law

Constitutional Design

Consumer Finance

Consumer Law

Contracts

Copyright

Corporate

Corporate Finance

Corporate Fraud

Corporate Governance

Corporations

Crim

Crim

Crim Justice Administration

Crim Pro

Criminal Defense

Critical Legal Studies

Critical Legal Theory

Critical Race Theory

Cross-Border Business

Cross-Border Insolvency

Cultural Property

Cyber Law

Cybersecurity

Death Penalty

Debtor and Creditor

Disability Law

Disaster Law

Dispute Resolution

Diversity & Law

Domestic Violence

Education

Elder Law

Election Law

Empirical Legal Studies

Empirical Methods

Employee Benefits

Employment Disc

Employment Law

Energy Law

English Legal History

Enivronmental

Entertainment Law

Entrepreneurship

Environmental

Ethics

Evidence

Experiential Learning

Experimental Methods in Law

Extradition

Family Law

FDA Law

Fed Courts

Federal Sentencing

Federalism

Feminist Legal Theory

Finance

Financial Institutions

Financial Reform

Financial Regulation

Financial Stability

Financial Transactions

First Amendment

Food Law & Policy

Foreign Relations

Freedom of Expression

Gender & Law

Genetics and the Law

Health Care

Health Care Financing

Health Care Reg

Health Law

Healthcare

History of Common Law

Housing Finance

Housing Law

Human Rights

IBT

Immigration

Immigration

Indigent Defense

Information Law

Information Privacy

Institutional Structures

Insurance Law

International Law

International Trade

Internet Law

Int'l Arbitration

Int'l Business Transactions

Int'l Civil Litigation

Int'l Con Law

Int'l Crim

Int'l Development

Int'l Economic Law

Int'l Economics Law

Int'l Energy Law

Int'l Financial Reg.

Int'l Human Rights

Int'l Humantarian Law

Int'l IP

Int'l Law & Dispute Settlement

Int'l Orgs

Int'l Trade and Investment

Investment Funds

Investment Law

IP

Islamic Law

Judicial Administration

Judicial Behavior

Judicial Writing

Jurisdiction

Jurisprudence

Juvenile Justice

Labor & Employment

Labor Law

Land Use

Law & Anthropology

Law & Development

Law & Econ

Law & Finance

Law & Gender

Law & Lit

Law & Neuroscience

Law & Philosophy

Law & Psychology

Law & Religion

Law & Science

Law & Sexuality

Law & Social Movements

Law & Social Science

Law & Society

Law & Sociology

Law & Statistics

Law & Tech

Law & the Economy

Law and Citizenship

Law Firm Management

Law of Democracy

Law of the Sea

Law of War

Law of Warfare

Legal Anthropology

Legal Ethics

Legal History

Legal Philosophy

Legal Profession

Legal Theory

Legal Writing

Legislation

Litigation

Local Government

Machine Learning

Maritime Law

Media & Communications Law

Media Law

Mediation

Medieval Law

Mergers and Acquisitions

Military Law

National Security

Natural Resources

Negotiation

Neuroscience & the Law

Nonprofits

Oil & Gas

Patent Law

Police Accountability

Political Theory

Post-Conflict Justice

Post-Conflict Obligations

Post-Conviction Crim Pro

Poverty Law

Poverty, Inequality, Race & the Law

Presidential Powers

Prison Law and Policy

Prisoner's Rights

Privacy

Private Int'l Law

Prof Resp

Property

Public Int'l Law

Public Law

Race & the Law

Real Estate Law

Real Property

Refugee Law

Regulation

Regulation of Police

Regulation of Risk

Regulation of Vice

Remedies

Roman Law

Rule of Law

Rural Development

Science & Law

Sec Reg

Secured Transactions

Sentencing

Sentencing Reform

Separation of Powers

Social Enterprise

Social Welfare Law

Sociology

South Asian Law & Politics

Statutory Interpretation

Tax

Tax Exempt Orgs

Technology Law

Telecommunications

Torts

Torts

Trade Law

Trademarks

Transnational Litigation

Trial Ad

Trusts & Estates

Venture Capital

Veterans Law

Water Law

White Collar Crime

Wills & Trusts

Work & Family

Workplace Law

Wrongful Convictions

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on May 23, 2018 at 07:22 PM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (7)

Monday, May 21, 2018

Entry Level Hiring 2018 - PhDs and Clinical Hires

In the comments below, Orin Kerr raises two interesting questions. First, "One interesting question to see would be percent of hires over time that have a doctorate degree. "

Here, I've broken out the degrees by law doctorates (not counting JDs, of course) and other doctorates. In recent years the Yale PhD has come on the scene, thus increasing the law doctorates. (Click for larger image.)

There are indeed a higher percentage of PhDs, both law and otherwise, over the last two years. It will be interesting over the next few years to see whether this is a trend.

Percent PhDs.20180521

Orin also asks: "Am I right that these numbers are for all tenure-track hiring, whether for clinical positions or for non-clinical positions? I ask that because I have a vague impression of a trend toward making entry-level clinical positions tenure-track instead of non-tenure track. If that trend is happening -- a big if, of course --I wonder how that may be changing the tenure-track numbers you find." Below I've broken out the clinical tenure track hires over the years. There doesn't seem to me to be a notable change in this percentage in the last few years.

Clinical Percent.20180521

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on May 21, 2018 at 10:48 PM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (3)

Spring Self-Reported Entry Level Hiring Report 2018

Following is a data summary of the Spring Self-Reported Entry Level Hiring Report for 2018. To remain consistent with past years, while the spreadsheet contains all hiring information received, the data analysis includes only tenure-track hires at U.S. law schools. (The data analysis also includes one hire requested not to be included in the spreadsheet at the date of this posting, although the person will eventually be included in the spreadsheet.)

Here is the full spreadsheet:

The data includes 77 tenure-track hires at U.S. law schools, at 57 different law schools.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions:

Q: How does 77 reported hires compare to past years?

A: This is an improvement from 2017, and with this last year, it begins to look like we hit the “new normal” in 2014 and have seen fluctuations from around that level since then. The average number of hires per year since 2014 is 73. (I omit 2010 in this and all subsequent cross-year comparisons because insufficient data was collected that year.)

Hires over Time.20180528

The ratio of hires to first-round FAR forms is also up slightly (click chart for bigger version):

Hires per FAR.20180524

Hires per FAR Chart.20180528


Q: You say the hires were at 57 different schools. How does that compare to previous years?

A: Many more schools hired this year than last year. The number of schools hiring was comparable to previous years since 2014.

Schools Hiring.20180524

Hires per school per year may also be of interest:

Hires per School.20180528

Q: How many reported hires got their JD from School X?

JD School.20180528

Yale 18; Columbia 8; NYU 8; Harvard 6; Stanford 4; Vanderbilt 3.

Schools in the “other” category with two JD/LLBs who reported hires: BYU, Chicago, Georgetown.

Schools in the “other” category with one JD/LLB who reported hires: American, Belarusian State U, Berkeley, Boston College, Boston University, Chicago-Kent, Cologne, Duke, Fordham, Georgia, Hebrew University, Kentucky, Lisbon, LSU, Michigan, Northeastern, Northwestern, Notre Dame, Penn, Texas, Queensland, UBC, UCLA, USC.

This information comes with two related caveats.

First, the spreadsheet reports the number of hires who received a JD from a particular school who accepted a tenure-track job, but not the number of JDs on the market who received a tenure-track job offer.

Second, the spreadsheet reports the count of JDs from a particular school, but not the rate at which JDs received (or accepted) offers. A smaller school with a high placement rate thus might not appear on the chart, whereas a larger program with a low placement rate might appear. This caveat means that smaller schools may be undervalued if one relies only on this data, while larger schools might be overvalued. 

Q: How many reported hires had a fellowship, degree, or clerkship?

56 (about 74%) had a fellowship; 42 (about 55%) had a clerkship; 54 (about 70%) had a higher degree. Three reported hires didn’t have either an advanced degree or a fellowship.

Venn diagram:

Venn Diagram.20190102

Q: Not as many fellowships...

A: Yes, the rate of fellowships remains high, though lower than it has been since 2012.

Fellowship Rate.20180528


 Q: From what law schools  did people get these fellowships?

I count here any law school at which a person reports having a fellowship. So one person could account for two schools’ being listed here. For example, if a single individual had a fellowship at Columbia followed by a fellowship at NYU, that would be reflected below as +1 to Columbia and +1 to NYU.

Fellowship School.20180524

Columbia 10; NYU 8; Yale 7; Harvard 6; Chicago 4; Georgetown 4; Other 25.

This information comes with the same two caveats as the JD numbers.

First, the spreadsheet reports the number of hires who received a fellowship from a particular school who accepted a tenure-track job, but not the number of fellows who received a tenure-track job offer. This caveat likely applies to all or nearly all fellowship programs. Presumably, someone choosing between fellowships cares more about how many people received tenure-track job offers than about how many people accepted those offers.

Second, the spreadsheet reports the count of fellows, but not the rate at which fellows received (or accepted) offers. A smaller program with a high placement rate thus might not appear on the chart, whereas a larger program with a low placement rate might appear. This caveat means that smaller programs may be undervalued if one relies only on this data, while larger programs might be overvalued.

Q: Tell me more about these advanced degrees. 

Okay, but first a caveat: Although some people had more than one advanced degree, the following looks only at what seemed to me to be the "highest" degree someone earned. For example, someone with a Ph.D. and an LL.M. would be counted only as a Ph.D. for purposes of this question. (This tracks the "Other Degree (1)" column.)

That said, looking only at what seemed to be the most advanced degree, and including expected degrees, the 52 "highest" advanced degrees broke down like this:

Highest Degree.20180528

Ph.D., SJD, JSD, D.Phil. 36; Masters 7; LL.M. 9; MBA 1.

Topics ranged all over the map. For the 32 Ph.D.s, 7 had degrees in History or US History; 4 in Philosophy, 3 in Law, 2 in economics, 2 in sociology, and the other Ph.D./D.Phil. topics, each of which had only hire, were Anthropology, Comp Lit, Ethnomusicology, Government, JSP, Law and Economics, Law & Society, Literature, Policy Studies, Political Philosophy, Political Science, Politics, Psychology, and Statistics in Law and Government.

Q: How long ago did these reported hires get their initial law degrees?

Year of JD.20180528

Zero to Four Years (Graduated 2014-2018) 24; Five to Nine Years (Graduated 2009-2013) 31; Ten to 19 Years (Graduated 1999-2008) 20; Twenty or More Years (Graduated before 1999) 2.

Q: How do the "time since initial degree" numbers compare to previous years?

A: They are very similar.

Hires by JD Year Chart.20180528

Q: Could you break the reported hires out by men/women?

MenWomen.20180528

Men 38 (49%); women 39 (51%). (Let’s say this is right within +/-2 people.)

Based on a quick count of a number of years of spreadsheets that I happen to have, gender hiring over time follows. (I’ve left out the data labels because I am even less sure than usual of the exactness of the numbers, but they’re roughly right as reflections of self-reported hiring each spring—first Solum’s reports, then mine. And as always, 2010 is left out due to missing data for that year.) 

Gender Over Time.20180528

Q: More slicing! More dicing! Different slicing! Different dicing!

Sure--you can do it yourself, or ask questions in the comments and I'll see what I can do, or we'll work it out as a group.

Q: This is all wrong! I know for a fact that more people from School Y were hired!

Yes, this spreadsheet is certainly missing some information. Repeat: this spreadsheet is incomplete. It represents only those entry-level hires that were reported to me, either through the comments on this blog or via email. It is without question incomplete. 

If you want to know about real entry level hiring, I commend to you Brian Leiter's report (hiring 1995-2011), the Katz et al. article (all law professors as of 2008), the George and Yoon article (entry level, 2007-2008 hiring year), and the Tsesis Report (entry level, 2012-2013 hiring year). This is just a report about self-reported entry level hires as of the spring before the school year starts. 

Q: Is this available in an easy-to-print format?

A: Why, as it happens, yes!

Originally posted 5/21/2018; revised 5/24/2018 and 5/28/2018 to add one hire each time and fix some errors; revised 7/12/2018 to make the written numbers under the graph for "Year of JD" match the graph (the PDF was already correct); revised 1/2/2019 to correct numbers in the Venn diagram and similarly update the PDF.

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on May 21, 2018 at 10:43 AM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (4)

Thursday, May 10, 2018

Entry Level Hiring: The 2018 Report - Final (?) Call for Information

This is, I think, the final call for information for the Entry Level Hiring Report. I currently plan to close reporting on Friday, May 18. If, however, you know that there is ongoing hiring, please let me know, and I will extend that date. Absent any such information, though, I will close the report on Friday, May 18.

If you have information about entry-level hires for this year, or know that there are outstanding entry-level offers that will not be resolved until after May 18, please either email me directly (sarah *dot* lawsky *at* law *dot* northwestern *dot* edu), or add a comment to the original information-gathering post.

Please encourage anyone you know who has accepted a job but isn't reflected on the spreadsheet to contact me.

As a reminder, I am looking to collect the following information for tenure-track, clinical, or legal writing full-time entry-level hires: 

Basic Information: Name, Hiring School, JD Institution, JD Year of Graduation

Other Degrees: Type of Degree,  Degree Granting Institution, Degree Subject

Fellowship, VAP, or Visiting Professorship: Institution and Type (e.g., VAP, name of fellowship, etc.)

Clerkship: Court (e.g., 9th Circuit, Texas Supreme Court, etc.)

Areas of Speciality (up to four) (if you are a clinical or LRW hire, please list this as your first Area of Specialty)

Type of Position: Tenure Track or Non-Tenure Track (if you are clinical or LRW and also tenure-track, please indicate this)

(Comments are closed on this post in order to drive comments to the original post.)

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on May 10, 2018 at 01:28 PM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Entry Level Hiring: The 2018 Report - Second Call for Information

This a reminder of the Entry Level Hiring Report.

If you have information about entry-level hires for this year, please either email me directly (sarah *dot* lawsky *at* law *dot* northwestern *dot* edu), or add a comment to the original information-gathering post.

Please encourage anyone you know who has accepted a job but isn't reflected on the spreadsheet to contact me.

As a reminder, I am looking to collect the following information for tenure-track, clinical, or legal writing full-time entry-level hires: 

Basic Information: Name, Hiring School, JD Institution, JD Year of Graduation

Other Degrees: Type of Degree,  Degree Granting Institution, Degree Subject

Fellowship, VAP, or Visiting Professorship: Institution and Type (e.g., VAP, name of fellowship, etc.)

Clerkship: Court (e.g., 9th Circuit, Texas Supreme Court, etc.)

Areas of Speciality (up to four) (if you are a clinical or LRW hire, please list this as your first Area of Specialty)

Type of Position: Tenure Track or Non-Tenure Track (if you are clinical or LRW and also tenure-track, please indicate this)

(Comments are closed on this post in order to drive comments to the original post.)

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on April 10, 2018 at 10:01 AM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, March 02, 2018

Entry Level Hiring: The 2018 Report - Call for Information

Time once again for the entry level hiring report.

I will gather the following information for tenure-track, clinical, or legal writing full-time entry-level hires: 

Basic Information: Name, Hiring School, JD Institution, JD Year of Graduation

Other Degrees: Type of Degree,  Degree Granting Institution, Degree Subject

Fellowship, VAP, or Visiting Professorship: Institution and Type (e.g., VAP, name of fellowship, etc.)

Clerkship: Court (e.g., 9th Circuit, Texas Supreme Court, etc.)

Areas of Speciality (up to four) (if you are a clinical or LRW hire, please list this as your first Area of Specialty)

Type of Position: Tenure Track or Non-Tenure Track (if you are clinical or LRW and also tenure-track, please indicate this)

The information will be aggregated on this spreadsheet (which is reproduced below and which you can view and download by clicking on this link); scroll across to see all of the information we will be aggregating.

Please leave the information in the comments, and, to protect those on the job market, please sign the comment with your real name. (Ideally, the reporting person would be either the hired individual or someone from the hiring committee at the hiring school.) If you would like to email information instead of posting it, please send it to Sarah Lawsky at sarah *dot* lawsky *at* law *dot* northwestern *dot* edu. Remember: you can't edit the spreadsheet yourself. To get your information into the spreadsheet, you must either post in the comments or email me.

I will also gather the names of schools that are doing no entry-level hiring this year (that's the second tab on the spreadsheet), so if you know for sure that your school is not doing entry-level hiring, please post that in the comments or email me.

If you see any errors, or if I have incorporated your information into the spreadsheet but you are not yet ready to make it public, please don't hesitate to email me, and I will take care of the problem as soon as I can.

Clarifications:

The list does not include people who were full-time non-tenure track clinicians who are now moving to a tenure track job at a different school, as these don't seem like true entry-level hires to me. This is the situation where a person is at a school that does not provide tenure to clinicians, and then moves to a school that does provide tenure to clinicians.

The list does include people who had a non-professor job in a law school and then moved to a professor job that was tenure track. Thus a person may have worked at a law school for many years, but still be considered an entry level hire. To indicate this situation, I will put their previous job at a law school in the "fellowship" category, and note "non-TT to TT" in the "Notes" category. This is not to indicate that this isn't an entry-level hire, but rather to give information about the nature of the item listed as a fellowship. (I.e., not a temporary position, as fellowships usually are.)

Other links:

This report follows in the tradition of Larry Solum's excellent work over many years.

2017 initial post, 2017 spreadsheet, 2017 report (with graphs).

2016 initial post, 2016 spreadsheet, 2016 report (with graphs). 

2015 initial post, 2015 spreadsheet, 2015 report (with graphs).

2014 initial post, 2014 spreadsheet, 2014 report (with graphs).

2013 initial post, 2013 spreadsheet, 2013 report (with graphs).

2012 initial post, 2012 spreadsheet, 2012 report (with graphs).

2011 initial post, 2011 spreadsheet, 2011 report (with graphs).

All PrawfsBlawg entry level hiring report tagged posts.

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on March 2, 2018 at 04:01 PM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (11)

Thursday, June 01, 2017

Spring Self-Reported Entry Level Hiring Report 2017

Following is a data summary of the Spring Self-Reported Entry Level Hiring Report for 2017. To remain consistent with past years, while the spreadsheet contains all hiring information received, the data analysis includes only tenure-track hires at U.S. law schools. (The data analysis also includes one hire requested not to be included in the spreadsheet.)

Here is the full spreadsheet:

The data includes 62 tenure-track hires at U.S. law schools, at 42 different law schools.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions:

Q: How does 62 reported hires compare to past years?

A: Fewer than any year previously reported.

Reported Hires.20170601

The ratio of hires to first-round FAR forms also fell:

Hires per FAR.20170601
  Hires per FAR Chart.20170601

Q: You say the hires were at 42 different schools. How does that compare to previous years?

A: Also lower.

Schools Hiring.20170601

Hires per school per year may also be of interest:

Hires per School.20170601

Q: How many reported hires got their JD from School X?

JD From.20170601

NYU 9; Harvard 9; Yale 9; Northwestern 4; Columbia 3; Michigan 3.

Schools in the “other” category with two JD/LLBs who reported hires: Berkeley; Georgetown; Hebrew; Penn; Stanford; Virginia.

Schools in the “other” category with one JD/LLB who reported hires: Duke; Cardozo; Catholic (Portugal); Emory; Fordham; Genoa; ITAM; Seoul National; Texas; Vanderbilt; University of Washington.

This information comes with two related caveats.

First, the spreadsheet reports the number of hires who received a JD from a particular school who accepted a tenure-track job, but not the number of JDs on the market who received a tenure-track job offer.

Second, the spreadsheet reports the count of JDs from a particular school, but not the rate at which JDs received (or accepted) offers. A smaller school with a high placement rate thus might not appear on the chart, whereas a larger program with a low placement rate might appear. This caveat means that smaller schools may be undervalued if one relies only on this data, while larger schools might be overvalued. 

Q: How many reported hires had a fellowship, degree, or clerkship?

51 (about 82%) had a fellowship; 32 (about 52%) had a clerkship; 42 (about 68%) had a higher degree. Only one reported hire didn’t have either an advanced degree or a fellowship.

Nonproportional Venn diagram:

Venn Diagram.20170601

Q: A lot of fellowships!

A: Yes.

Fellowship Rate.20170601


 Q: From what law schools  did people get these fellowships?

I count here any law school at which a person reports having a fellowship. So one person could account for two schools’ being listed here. For example, if a single individual had a fellowship at Columbia followed by a fellowship at NYU, that would be reflected below as +1 to Columbia and +1 to NYU.

Fellowship School.20170601

Harvard 10; NYU 9; Georgetown 6; Penn 5; Columbia 4; Other 30.

This information comes with the same two caveats as the JD numbers.

First, the spreadsheet reports the number of hires who received a fellowship from a particular school who accepted a tenure-track job, but not the number of fellows who received a tenure-track job offer. This caveat likely applies to all or nearly all fellowship programs. Presumably, someone choosing between fellowships cares more about how many people received tenure-track job offers than about how many people accepted those offers.

Second, the spreadsheet reports the count of fellows, but not the rate at which fellows received (or accepted) offers. A smaller program with a high placement rate thus might not appear on the chart, whereas a larger program with a low placement rate might appear. This caveat means that smaller programs may be undervalued if one relies only on this data, while larger programs might be overvalued.

Q: Tell me more about these advanced degrees. 

Okay, but first a caveat: Although some people had more than one advanced degree, the following looks only at what seemed to me to be the "highest" degree someone earned. For example, someone with a Ph.D. and an LL.M. would be counted only as a Ph.D. for purposes of this question. (This tracks the "Other Degree (1)" column.)

That said, looking only at what seemed to be the most advanced degree, and including expected degrees, the 42 "highest" advanced degrees broke down like this:

Highest Degree.20170601

Ph.D., SJD, JSD, D.Phil. 26; Masters 8; LL.M. 7; MBA 1.

Topics ranged all over the map. For the 26 Ph.D.s and expected Ph.Ds, 4 had degrees in Economics; 2 in sociology; and the other Ph.D./D.Phil. topics, each of which had only hire, were American History; American Studies; Comparative Law; Criminology; Finance and Economics; History; History of American Civilization; JSP; Law; Law and Economics; Near Eastern Languages and Civilization; Neuroscience; Philosophy; Political Science; Rhetoric; Social Anthropology and Law & Society.

Q: How long ago did these reported hires get their initial law degrees?

Year of JD.20170601

Zero to Four Years (Graduated 2012-2016) 13; Five to Nine Years (Graduated 2007-2011) 28;  Ten to 19 Years (Graduated 1997-2006) 20; Twenty or More Years (Graduated before 1996) 0.

Q: How do the "time since initial degree" numbers compare to previous years?

A: They are very similar.

Years Since Grad Chart.20170601

 

Q: Could you break the reported hires out by men/women?

Gender.20170601

Men 30 (about 48%); women 32 (about 52%). (Let’s say this is right within +/-2 people.)

Based on a quick count of a number of years of spreadsheets that I happen to have, gender hiring over time follows. (I’ve left out the data labels because I am even less sure than usual of the exactness of the numbers, but they’re roughly right as reflections of self-reported hiring each spring—first Solum’s reports, then mine. And as always, 2010 is left out due to missing data for that year.) 

Percent Male.20170601

Q: More slicing! More dicing! Different slicing! Different dicing!

Sure--you can do it yourself, or ask questions in the comments and I'll see what I can do, or we'll work it out as a group.

Q: This is all wrong! I know for a fact that more people from School Y were hired!

Yes, this spreadsheet is certainly missing some information. Repeat: this spreadsheet is incomplete. It represents only those entry-level hires that were reported to me, either through the comments on this blog or via email. It is without question incomplete. 

If you want to know about real entry level hiring, I commend to you Brian Leiter's report (hiring 1995-2011), the Katz et al. article (all law professors as of 2008), the George and Yoon article (entry level, 2007-2008 hiring year), and the Tsesis Report (entry level, 2012-2013 hiring year). This is just a report about self-reported entry level hires as of the spring before the school year starts. 

Q: Is this available in an easy-to-print format?

A: Why, as it happens, yes!

Originally posted 6/1/2017.

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on June 1, 2017 at 01:06 PM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (23)

Tuesday, May 30, 2017

Entry Level Hiring: The 2017 Report - Final Call for Information

This is the final call for information for the Entry Level Hiring Report. I will close reporting on Thursday, June 1. 

If you have information about entry-level hires for this year, please either email me directly (sarah *dot* lawsky *at* law *dot* northwestern *dot* edu), or add a comment to the original information-gathering post.

Please encourage anyone you know who has accepted a job but isn't reflected on the spreadsheet to contact me.

As a reminder, I am looking to collect the following information for tenure-track, clinical, or legal writing full-time entry-level hires: 

Basic Information: Name, Hiring School, JD Institution, JD Year of Graduation

Other Degrees: Type of Degree,  Degree Granting Institution, Degree Subject

Fellowship, VAP, or Visiting Professorship: Institution and Type (e.g., VAP, name of fellowship, etc.)

Clerkship: Court (e.g., 9th Circuit, Texas Supreme Court, etc.)

Areas of Speciality (up to four) (if you are a clinical or LRW hire, please list this as your first Area of Specialty)

Type of Position: Tenure Track or Non-Tenure Track (if you are clinical or LRW and also tenure-track, please indicate this)

(Comments are closed on this post in order to drive comments to the original post.)

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on May 30, 2017 at 12:01 PM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, May 08, 2017

Entry Level Hiring, The 2017 Report - Not Last Call for Information

The hiring season is not yet over, so I will not be closing the Entry Level Hiring report today. Rather, I will leave it open until the end of May.  As always, please submit information regarding entry-level hiring to me via email or the original post.

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on May 8, 2017 at 10:27 AM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, May 01, 2017

Entry Level Hiring: The 2017 Report - Final (?) Call for Information

Update, 5/5/17: It appears that the hiring process at several schools will not be over until at least the end of the month, so I will hold off closing the report until then.

 

This is, I think, the final call for information for the Entry Level Hiring Report. I currently plan to close reporting on Monday, May 8. If, however, you know that there is ongoing hiring (last year, for example, I was told that some schools were working on hiring until mid-May), please let me know, and I will extend that date. Absent any such information, though, I will close the report on Monday, May 8.

If you have information about entry-level hires for this year, or know that there are outstanding entry-level offers that will not be resolved until after May 8, please either email me directly (sarah *dot* lawsky *at* law *dot* northwestern *dot* edu), or add a comment to the original information-gathering post.

Please encourage anyone you know who has accepted a job but isn't reflected on the spreadsheet to contact me.

As a reminder, I am looking to collect the following information for tenure-track, clinical, or legal writing full-time entry-level hires: 

Basic Information: Name, Hiring School, JD Institution, JD Year of Graduation

Other Degrees: Type of Degree,  Degree Granting Institution, Degree Subject

Fellowship, VAP, or Visiting Professorship: Institution and Type (e.g., VAP, name of fellowship, etc.)

Clerkship: Court (e.g., 9th Circuit, Texas Supreme Court, etc.)

Areas of Speciality (up to four) (if you are a clinical or LRW hire, please list this as your first Area of Specialty)

Type of Position: Tenure Track or Non-Tenure Track (if you are clinical or LRW and also tenure-track, please indicate this)

(Comments are closed on this post in order to drive comments to the original post.)

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on May 1, 2017 at 11:00 AM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Entry Level Hiring: The 2017 Report - Second Call for Information

This a reminder of the Entry Level Hiring Report.

If you have information about entry-level hires for this year, please either email me directly (sarah *dot* lawsky *at* law *dot* northwestern *dot* edu), or add a comment to the original information-gathering post.

Please encourage anyone you know who has accepted a job but isn't reflected on the spreadsheet to contact me.

As a reminder, I am looking to collect the following information for tenure-track, clinical, or legal writing full-time entry-level hires: 

Basic Information: Name, Hiring School, JD Institution, JD Year of Graduation

Other Degrees: Type of Degree,  Degree Granting Institution, Degree Subject

Fellowship, VAP, or Visiting Professorship: Institution and Type (e.g., VAP, name of fellowship, etc.)

Clerkship: Court (e.g., 9th Circuit, Texas Supreme Court, etc.)

Areas of Speciality (up to four) (if you are a clinical or LRW hire, please list this as your first Area of Specialty)

Type of Position: Tenure Track or Non-Tenure Track (if you are clinical or LRW and also tenure-track, please indicate this)

(Comments are closed on this post in order to drive comments to the original post.)

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on April 12, 2017 at 10:14 AM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, March 16, 2017

Entry Level Hiring: The 2017 Report - Call for Information

Time once again for the entry level hiring report.

I will gather the following information for tenure-track, clinical, or legal writing full-time entry-level hires: 

Basic Information: Name, Hiring School, JD Institution, JD Year of Graduation

Other Degrees: Type of Degree,  Degree Granting Institution, Degree Subject

Fellowship, VAP, or Visiting Professorship: Institution and Type (e.g., VAP, name of fellowship, etc.)

Clerkship: Court (e.g., 9th Circuit, Texas Supreme Court, etc.)

Areas of Speciality (up to four) (if you are a clinical or LRW hire, please list this as your first Area of Specialty)

Type of Position: Tenure Track or Non-Tenure Track (if you are clinical or LRW and also tenure-track, please indicate this)

The information will be aggregated on this spreadsheet (which is reproduced below and which you can view and download by clicking on this link); scroll across to see all of the information we will be aggregating.

Please leave the information in the comments, and, to protect those on the job market, please sign the comment with your real name. (Ideally, the reporting person would be either the hired individual or someone from the hiring committee at the hiring school.) If you would like to email information instead of posting it, please send it to Sarah Lawsky at sarah *dot* lawsky *at* law *dot* northwestern *dot* edu. Remember: you can't edit the spreadsheet yourself. To get your information into the spreadsheet, you must either post in the comments or email me.

I will also gather the names of schools that are doing no entry-level hiring this year (that's the second tab on the spreadsheet), so if you know for sure that your school is not doing entry-level hiring, please post that in the comments or email me.

If you see any errors, or if I have incorporated your information into the spreadsheet but you are not yet ready to make it public, please don't hesitate to email me, and I will take care of the problem as soon as I can.

Clarifications:

The list does not include people who were full-time non-tenure track clinicians who are now moving to a tenure track job at a different school, as these don't seem like true entry-level hires to me. This is the situation where a person is at a school that does not provide tenure to clinicians, and then moves to a school that does provide tenure to clinicians.

The list does include people who had a non-professor job in a law school and then moved to a professor job that was tenure track. Thus a person may have worked at a law school for many years, but still be considered an entry level hire. To indicate this situation, I will put their previous job at a law school in the "fellowship" category, and note "non-TT to TT" in the "Notes" category. This is not to indicate that this isn't an entry-level hire, but rather to give information about the nature of the item listed as a fellowship. (I.e., not a temporary position, as fellowships usually are.)

Other links:

This report follows in the tradition of Larry Solum's excellent work over many years.

2016 initial post, 2016 spreadsheet, 2016 report (with graphs). 

2015 initial post, 2015 spreadsheet, 2015 report (with graphs).

2014 initial post, 2014 spreadsheet, 2014 report (with graphs).

2013 initial post, 2013 spreadsheet, 2013 report (with graphs).

2012 initial post, 2012 spreadsheet, 2012 report (with graphs).

2011 initial post, 2011 spreadsheet, 2011 report (with graphs).

All PrawfsBlawg entry level hiring report tagged posts.

Originally posted 3/16/17.

 

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on March 16, 2017 at 12:30 PM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (57)

Wednesday, May 11, 2016

Spring Self-Reported Entry Level Hiring Report 2016

Following is a data summary of the Spring Self-Reported Entry Level Hiring Report for 2016. To remain consistent with past years, while the spreadsheet contains all hiring information received, the data analysis includes only tenure-track hires at U.S. law schools.

Here is the full spreadsheet:

The spreadsheet includes 83 tenure-track hires at U.S. law schools, at 55 different law schools.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions:

Q: How does 83 reported hires compare to past years?

A: Better! (I omit 2010 in this and all subsequent cross-year comparisons because insufficient data was collected that year.)

  01 Reported Hires.20160508

Not only were more people hired, but there were also fewer people in the first round of the FAR forms, so the ratio of hires to first-round FAR forms was better this year than in recent years:

02 Hires Per FAR.20160508
 

03 Hires Per FAR Chart.20160508

Q: You say the hires were at 55 different schools. How does that compare to previous years?

A: About the same as the last two years.

04 Schools Hiring.20160508

Hires per school per year may also be of interest:

05 Hires Per School.20160508

Q: How many reported hires got their JD from School X?

06 JD School.20160508

Yale 18; Harvard 11; NYU 9; Stanford 8; Columbia 6; Chicago 6; Other 25.

Schools in the “other” category with three JD/LLBs who reported hires: Berkeley.

Schools in the “other” category with two JD/LLBs who reported hires: GW, Michigan, UCLA, Virginia.

Schools in the “other” category with one JD/LLB who reported hires: Ain Shams Faculty of Law, Boston College, Brooklyn, Cambridge, Cornell, Georgetown, Hastings, Hebrew University, Iowa, Nebraska, Pittsburgh, Thomas Jefferson, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, USC.

This information comes with two related caveats.

First, the spreadsheet reports the number of hires who received a JD from a particular school who accepted a tenure-track job, but not the number of JDs on the market who received a tenure-track job offer.

Second, the spreadsheet reports the count of JDs from a particular school, but not the rate at which JDs received (or accepted) offers. A smaller school with a high placement rate thus might not appear on the chart, whereas a larger program with a low placement rate might appear. This caveat means that smaller schools may be undervalued if one relies only on this data, while larger schools might be overvalued. 

Q: How many reported hires had a fellowship, degree, or clerkship?

66 (about 80%) had a fellowship; 41 (about 49%) had an advanced degree; 44 (about 53%) had a clerkship.

Nonproportional Venn diagram:

07 Entry level hiring Venn.20160508

Q: A lot of fellowships!

A: Yes.

08 Fellowship Rate.20160508
 Q: From what law schools  did people get these fellowships?

I count here any law school at which a person reports having a fellowship. So one person could account for two schools’ being listed here. For example, if a single individual had a fellowship at Columbia followed by a fellowship at NYU, that would be reflected below as +1 to Columbia and +1 to NYU.

Fellowship School.20160508

NYU 12; Columbia 11; Harvard 9; Stanford 6; UCLA 5; Penn 4; Other 28.

This information comes with the same two caveats as the JD numbers.

First, the spreadsheet reports the number of hires who received a fellowship from a particular school who accepted a tenure-track job, but not the number of fellows who received a tenure-track job offer. This caveat likely applies to all or nearly all fellowship programs. Presumably, someone choosing between fellowships cares more about how many people received tenure-track job offers than about how many people accepted those offers.

Second, the spreadsheet reports the count of fellows, but not the rate at which fellows received (or accepted) offers. A smaller program with a high placement rate thus might not appear on the chart, whereas a larger program with a low placement rate might appear. This caveat means that smaller programs may be undervalued if one relies only on this data, while larger programs might be overvalued.

The Bigelow Program at the University of Chicago illustrates these two related points, though it is by no means unique. This year, all Bigelows on the market received tenure-track job offers. But (1) the Bigelow is a small program and (2) not all Bigelows who received offers accepted an offer. Thus only two Chicago fellows appear on the spreadsheet. But the relevant information for someone considering fellowships isn’t the raw count, but rather the overall success rate of Bigelow fellows on the job market: according to Brian Leiter, every Bigelow since at least 2008 has received at least one tenure-track offer. (Leiter has been at Chicago only since 2008, and believes this is true going back to the early 2000s, but isn’t certain.)

Q: Tell me more about these advanced degrees. 

Okay, but first a caveat: Although some people had more than one advanced degree, the following looks only at what seemed to me to be the "highest" degree someone earned. For example, someone with a Ph.D. and an LL.M. would be counted only as a Ph.D. for purposes of this question. (This tracks the "Other Degree (1)" column.)

That said, looking only at what seemed to be the most advanced degree, and including expected degrees, the 41 "highest" advanced degrees broke down like this:

10 Highest Degree.20160508

Ph.D., SJD, JSD, D.Phil. 21; Masters 16; LL.M. 3; MBA 1.

Topics ranged all over the map. For the 21 Ph.D.s, five had PhDs in Law (one JSD, one SJD, and three Yale Law Ph.D.s); History had three hires; Economics and Philosophy each had two hires; and the other Ph.D./D.Phil. topics, each of which had only hire, were Business, Criminology, English and Comparative Literature, Evidence-Based Social Intervention, Financial Economics, German, Medieval English, Psychology, and Sociology.

Q: How long ago did these reported hires get their initial law degrees?

Zero to Four Years (Graduated 2012-2016) 6; Five to Nine Years (Graduated 2007-2011) 49;  Ten to 19 Years (Graduated 1997-2006) 28; Twenty or More Years (Graduated before 1996) 0.

11 JD Year.20160508

Q: How do the "time since initial degree" numbers compare to previous years?

A: They are very similar.

12 Years Since Hire Over Time.20160508

Q: Could you break the reported hires out by men/women?

13 Male Female.20160508

Men 44 (about 53%); women 39 (about 47%). (Let’s say this is right within +/-2 people.)

Based on a quick count of a number of years of spreadsheets that I happen to have, gender hiring over time follows. (I’ve left out the data labels because I am even less sure than usual of the exactness of the numbers, but they’re roughly right as reflections of self-reported hiring each spring—first Solum’s reports, then mine. And as always, 2010 is left out due to missing data for that year.) This year, unlike the last two years but like every year before that for which I have data, there were more men hired than women.

14 Percent Male.20160508

Q: More slicing! More dicing! Different slicing! Different dicing!

Sure--you can do it yourself, or ask questions in the comments and I'll see what I can do, or we'll work it out as a group.

Q: This is all wrong! I know for a fact that more people from School Y were hired!

Yes, this spreadsheet is certainly missing some information. Repeat: this spreadsheet is incomplete. It represents only those entry-level hires that were reported to me, either through the comments on this blog or via email. It is without question incomplete. 

If you want to know about real entry level hiring, I commend to you Brian Leiter's report (hiring 1995-2011), the Katz et al. article (all law professors as of 2008), the George and Yoon article (entry level, 2007-2008 hiring year), and the Tsesis Report (entry level, 2012-2013 hiring year). This is just a report about self-reported entry level hires as of the spring before the school year starts. 

Q: Is this available in an easy-to-print format?

A: Why, as it happens, yes!

Originally posted 5/11/16; updated 5/11/16 to reflect accurately the areas of Ph.D.s.

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on May 11, 2016 at 01:14 PM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (11)

Tuesday, May 03, 2016

Entry Level Hiring: The 2016 Report - Final (?) Call for Information

This is, I think, the last call for information for the 2016 Entry Level Hiring Report. I currently plan to close reporting on Wednesday, May 11. If, however, you know that there is ongoing hiring, please let me know, and I will extend that date. Absent any such information, though, I will close the report on Wednesday, May 11. 

If you have information about entry-level hires for this year, or know that there are outstanding entry-level offers that will not be resolved until after May 11, please either email me directly (slawsky *at* law *dot* uci *dot* edu), or add a comment to the original information-gathering post.

Please encourage anyone you know who has accepted a job but isn't reflected on the spreadsheet to contact me.

As a reminder, I am looking to collect the following information for tenure-track, clinical, or legal writing full-time entry-level hires: 

Basic Information: Name, Hiring School, JD Institution, JD Year of Graduation

Other Degrees: Type of Degree,  Degree Granting Institution, Degree Subject

Fellowship, VAP, or Visiting Professorship: Institution and Type (e.g., VAP, name of fellowship, etc.)

Clerkship: Court (e.g., 9th Circuit, Texas Supreme Court, etc.)

Areas of Speciality (up to four) (if you are a clinical or LRW hire, please list this as your first Area of Specialty)

Type of Position: Tenure Track or Non-Tenure Track (if you are clinical or LRW and also tenure-track, please indicate this)

(Comments are closed on this post in order to drive comments to the original post.)

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on May 3, 2016 at 11:58 AM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, April 12, 2016

Entry Level Hiring: The 2016 Report - Second Call for Information.

This a reminder of the Entry Level Hiring Report.

If you have information about entry-level hires for this year, please either email me directly (slawsky *at* law *dot* uci *dot* edu), or add a comment to the original information-gathering post.

Please encourage anyone you know who has accepted a job but isn't reflected on the spreadsheet to contact me.

As a reminder, I am looking to collect the following information for tenure-track, clinical, or legal writing full-time entry-level hires: 

Basic Information: Name, Hiring School, JD Institution, JD Year of Graduation

Other Degrees: Type of Degree,  Degree Granting Institution, Degree Subject

Fellowship, VAP, or Visiting Professorship: Institution and Type (e.g., VAP, name of fellowship, etc.)

Clerkship: Court (e.g., 9th Circuit, Texas Supreme Court, etc.)

Areas of Speciality (up to four) (if you are a clinical or LRW hire, please list this as your first Area of Specialty)

Type of Position: Tenure Track or Non-Tenure Track (if you are clinical or LRW and also tenure-track, please indicate this)

(Comments are closed on this post in order to drive comments to the original post.)

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on April 12, 2016 at 05:25 PM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, March 14, 2016

Entry Level Hiring: The 2016 Report - Call for Information

Time once again for the entry level hiring report.

I will gather the following information for tenure-track, clinical, or legal writing full-time entry-level hires: 

Basic Information: Name, Hiring School, JD Institution, JD Year of Graduation

Other Degrees: Type of Degree,  Degree Granting Institution, Degree Subject

Fellowship, VAP, or Visiting Professorship: Institution and Type (e.g., VAP, name of fellowship, etc.)

Clerkship: Court (e.g., 9th Circuit, Texas Supreme Court, etc.)

Areas of Speciality (up to four) (if you are a clinical or LRW hire, please list this as your first Area of Specialty)

Type of Position: Tenure Track or Non-Tenure Track (if you are clinical or LRW and also tenure-track, please indicate this)

The information will be aggregated on this spreadsheet (which is reproduced below and which you can view and download by clicking on this link); scroll across to see all of the information we will be aggregating.

Please leave the information in the comments, and, to protect those on the job market, please sign the comment with your real name. (Ideally, the reporting person would be either the hired individual or someone from the hiring committee at the hiring school.) If you would like to email information instead of posting it, please send it to Sarah Lawsky at slawsky *at* law *dot* uci *dot* edu. Remember: you can't edit the spreadsheet yourself. To get your information into the spreadsheet, you must either post in the comments or email me.

I will also gather the names of schools that are doing no entry-level hiring this year (that's the second tab on the spreadsheet), so if you know for sure that your school is not doing entry-level hiring, please post that in the comments or email me.

If you see any errors, or if I have incorporated your information into the spreadsheet but you are not yet ready to make it public, please don't hesitate to email me, and I will take care of the problem as soon as I can.

Other links:

This report follows in the tradition of Larry Solum's excellent work over many years. 

2015 initial post, 2015 spreadsheet, 2015 report (with graphs).

2014 initial post, 2014 spreadsheet, 2014 report (with graphs).

2013 initial post, 2013 spreadsheet, 2013 report (with graphs).

2012 initial post, 2012 spreadsheet, 2012 report (with graphs).

2011 initial post, 2011 spreadsheet, 2011 report (with graphs).

All PrawfsBlawg entry level hiring report tagged posts.

Added 3/21/15: Some clarification: the list does not include people who were full-time non-tenure track clinicians who are now moving to a tenure track job at a different school, as these don't seem like true entry-level hires to me. This is the situation where a person is at a school that does not provide tenure to clinicians, and then moves to a school that does provide tenure to clinicians.

The list does include people who had a non-professor job in a law school and then moved to a professor job that was tenure track. Thus a person may have worked at a law school for many years, but still be considered an entry level hire. To indicate this situation, I will put their previous job at a law school in the "fellowship" category, and note "non-TT to TT" in the "Notes" category. This is not to indicate that this isn't an entry-level hire, but rather to give information about the nature of the item listed as a fellowship. (I.e., not a temporary position, as fellowships usually are.)

[Originally posted 3/14/16; edited 3/21/15.]

 

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on March 14, 2016 at 09:00 AM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (25)

Tuesday, May 19, 2015

Spring Self-Reported Entry Level Hiring Report 2015

Following is a data summary of the Spring Self-Reported Entry Level Hiring Report for 2015. To remain consistent with past years, while the spreadsheet contains all hiring information received, the data analysis includes only tenure-track hires at U.S. law schools.

Here is the full spreadsheet:

We have reports of 70 people being hired, at 52 different law schools.

(As of May 18, 2015, one person is not listed on the spreadsheet but is included in the data. This person will certainly receive a job this year, and at a school that is not otherwise hiring. The only question is which school. Thus I am able to incorporate this person's information into the analysis below.)

In general, this year’s report looks incredibly similar to last year’s.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions:

Q: How does 70 reported hires compare to past years?

A: Bad, but not much worse than last year. (I omit 2010 in this and all subsequent cross-year comparisons because insufficient data was collected that year.)

A.HiresOverTime.20150516

Q: It would also be good to know the percentage of those who registered with the AALS who got jobs. 

Good question. I don't quite have the necessary information, but I do know the number of forms in the first distributions of the FAR AALS forms, which probably isn't a terrible proxy. In this graph and chart, I compare the hiring in Year X to the number of forms in the first distribution in Year (X - 1) (because those are the people who were hired in Year X).

HiresFirstYearFAR.20150519

HiresFirstYearFARChart.20150519

Q: You say the hires were at 52 different schools. How does that compare to previous years?

A: Slightly more than last year’s report, and, of course, much less than other years'.

B.SchoolsHiring.20150516

Hires per school per year may also be of interest:

C.HiresPerSchool.20150516

Q: How many reported hires got their JD from School X?

D.JD From.20150516

Harvard 21; Stanford 6; Yale 6; Berkeley 5; Chicago 5; NYU 5; Other 21.

Schools in the "other" category with three JD/JJBs who reported hires: Georgetown.

Schools in the "other" category with two JD/LLBs who reported hires: Columbia, Virginia.

Schools in the "other" category with one JD/LLB who reported hires: BYU; Cambridge; Davis; Duke; Florida; Illinois; Iowa; Loyola-Chicago; Loyola-LA; Michigan; New Hampshire; Penn; Pittsburgh; Tulane.

Q: How many reported hires had a fellowship, degree, or clerkship?

58 (about 83%) had a fellowship; 36 (about 51%) had an advanced degree; 42 (60%) had a clerkship.

Nonproportional Venn diagram:

E.Entry level hiring Venn.20150516

This is similar to last year’s Venn diagram.

Q: That seems like a lot of fellowships. How does it compare to previous years?

A: It's a lot of fellowships, though comparable to 2014.

F.FellowshipRate.20150516

Q: Tell me more about these advanced degrees. 

Okay, but first a caveat: Although some people had more than one advanced degree, the following looks only at what seemed to me to be the "highest" degree someone earned. For example, someone with a Ph.D. and an LL.M. would be counted only as a Ph.D. for purposes of this question. (This tracks the "Other Degree (1)" column, for the two people out there who are actually following along on the spreadsheet.)

That said, looking only at what seemed to be the most advanced degree (apologizing in advance for mischaracterizing the relative advancement of anyone's multiple degrees), and including "expected" degrees, the 35 "highest" advanced degrees broke down like this:

G.Highest Degree.20150516

Ph.D. 18; LL.M. 8; Masters 10.

Topics ranged all over the map. For the 18 Ph.D.s, for example, Economics had three hires; History, JSP, and Political Science each had two hires; the other Ph.D. topics, each of which had only hire, were American Culture, Anthropology, Chemistry, Ethics and Health Policy, Government, Neuroscience, Philosophy, Social Psychology, and Sociology.

Q: How long ago did these reported hires get their initial law degrees?

Zero to Four Years (Graduated 2011-2015) 14; Five to Nine Years (Graduated 2006-2010) 36;  Ten to 19 Years (Graduated 1996-2005) 19; Twenty or More Years (Graduated before 1996) 1. The year-by-year break-out is on the spreadsheet ("Years Since Hire" tab).

H.YearofJD.20150516

Again, this is very similar to 2014.

Q: Could you break the reported hires out by men/women?

Women 39 (about 56%); Men 31 (about 44%). (Let's say this is right within +/-2 people.) 

I.MaleFemale.20150516

Based on a quick count of nine years of spreadsheets that I happen to have, gender hiring over time follows. (I've left out the data labels because I am even less sure than usual of the exactness of the numbers, but they're roughly right as reflections of self-reported hiring each spring--first Solum's reports, then mine. And as always, 2010 is left out due to missing data for that year.)

J.GenderOverTime.20150517

Q: More slicing! More dicing! Different slicing! Different dicing!

Sure--you can do it yourself, or ask questions in the comments and I'll see what I can do, or we'll work it out as a group.

Q: This is all wrong! I know for a fact that more people from School Y were hired!

Yes, this spreadsheet is certainly missing some information. Repeat: this spreadsheet is incomplete. It represents only those entry-level hires that were reported to me, either through the comments on this blog or via email. It is without question incomplete. 

If you want to know about real entry level hiring, I commend to you Brian Leiter's report (hiring 1995-2011), the Katz et al. article (all law professors as of 2008), the George and Yoon article (entry level, 2007-2008 hiring year), and the Tsesis Report (entry level, 2012-2013 hiring year). This is just a report about self-reported entry level hires as of the spring before the school year starts. 

Originally posted 5/19/15 9 a.m.; edited 5/19/15 11:40 a.m. to add Hires/First Round FAR Forms.

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on May 19, 2015 at 09:00 AM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (61)

Wednesday, May 13, 2015

Entry Level Hiring: The 2015 Report - Actual Final Call for Information

This is the actual final call for information for the 2015 Entry Level Hiring Report. I will close reporting on Monday, May 18.

If you know that you will be hired this year but haven't yet decided where you'll work (that is, you are considering multiple offers and won't have things resolved by Monday, May 18), please send me your information (other than "hiring school") anyway. I will leave you off the public spreadsheet, but I can still include the information in the data analysis.

Please encourage anyone you know who has accepted a job (or knows that they will accept a job) but isn't reflected on the spreadsheet to contact me, either in the comments to the original post or at by email, at slawsky*at*law*dot*uci*dot*edu.

As a reminder, I am looking to collect the following information for tenure-track, clinical, or legal writing full-time entry-level hires: 

Basic Information: Name, Hiring School, JD Institution, JD Year of Graduation

Other Degrees: Type of Degree,  Degree Granting Institution, Degree Subject

Fellowship, VAP, or Visiting Professorship: Institution and Type (e.g., VAP, name of fellowship, etc.)

Clerkship: Court (e.g., 9th Circuit, Texas Supreme Court, etc.)

Areas of Speciality (up to four) (if you are a clinical or LRW hire, please list this as your first Area of Specialty)

Type of Position: Tenure Track or Non-Tenure Track (if you are clinical or LRW and also tenure-track, please indicate this)

(Comments are closed on this post in order to drive comments to the original post.)

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on May 13, 2015 at 01:59 PM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, April 27, 2015

Entry Level Hiring: The 2015 Report - Final (?) Call for Information

This is, I think, the final call for information for the 2015 Entry Level Hiring Report. I currently plan to close reporting on Friday, May 1. If, however, you know that there is ongoing hiring (last year, for example, I was told that some schools were working on hiring until mid-May), please let me know, and I will extend that date. Absent any such information, though, I will close the report on Friday, May 1.

If you have information about entry-level hires for this year, or know that there are outstanding entry-level offers that will not be resolved until after May 1, please either email me directly (slawsky *at* law *dot* uci *dot* edu), or add a comment to the original information-gathering post.

Please encourage anyone you know who has accepted a job but isn't reflected on the spreadsheet to contact me.

As a reminder, I am looking to collect the following information for tenure-track, clinical, or legal writing full-time entry-level hires: 

Basic Information: Name, Hiring School, JD Institution, JD Year of Graduation

Other Degrees: Type of Degree,  Degree Granting Institution, Degree Subject

Fellowship, VAP, or Visiting Professorship: Institution and Type (e.g., VAP, name of fellowship, etc.)

Clerkship: Court (e.g., 9th Circuit, Texas Supreme Court, etc.)

Areas of Speciality (up to four) (if you are a clinical or LRW hire, please list this as your first Area of Specialty)

Type of Position: Tenure Track or Non-Tenure Track (if you are clinical or LRW and also tenure-track, please indicate this)

(Comments are closed on this post in order to drive comments to the original post.)

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on April 27, 2015 at 01:46 PM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, April 06, 2015

Entry Level Hiring: The 2015 Report - Second Call for Information

This is a reminder of the Entry Level Hiring Report. The numbers will be low this cycle, but the spreadsheet as it stands as of April 6 is certainly not anywhere near the final list.

If you have information about entry-level hires for this year, please either email me directly (slawsky *at* law *dot* uci *dot* edu), or add a comment to the original information-gathering post.

Please encourage anyone you know who has accepted a job but isn't reflected on the spreadsheet to contact me.

As a reminder, I am looking to collect the following information for tenure-track, clinical, or legal writing full-time entry-level hires: 

Basic Information: Name, Hiring School, JD Institution, JD Year of Graduation

Other Degrees: Type of Degree,  Degree Granting Institution, Degree Subject

Fellowship, VAP, or Visiting Professorship: Institution and Type (e.g., VAP, name of fellowship, etc.)

Clerkship: Court (e.g., 9th Circuit, Texas Supreme Court, etc.)

Areas of Speciality (up to four) (if you are a clinical or LRW hire, please list this as your first Area of Specialty)

Type of Position: Tenure Track or Non-Tenure Track (if you are clinical or LRW and also tenure-track, please indicate this)

(Comments are closed on this post in order to drive comments to the original post.)

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on April 6, 2015 at 02:18 PM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, March 02, 2015

Entry Level Hiring: The 2015 Report - Call for Information

Time once again for the entry level hiring report.

I will gather the following information for tenure-track, clinical, or legal writing full-time entry-level hires: 

Basic Information: Name, Hiring School, JD Institution, JD Year of Graduation

Other Degrees: Type of Degree,  Degree Granting Institution, Degree Subject

Fellowship, VAP, or Visiting Professorship: Institution and Type (e.g., VAP, name of fellowship, etc.)

Clerkship: Court (e.g., 9th Circuit, Texas Supreme Court, etc.)

Areas of Speciality (up to four) (if you are a clinical or LRW hire, please list this as your first Area of Specialty)

Type of Position: Tenure Track or Non-Tenure Track (if you are clinical or LRW and also tenure-track, please indicate this)

The information will be aggregated on this spreadsheet (which is reproduced below and which you can view and download by clicking on this link); scroll across to see all of the information we will be aggregating. 

Please leave the information in the comments, and, to protect those on the job market, please sign the comment with your real name. (Ideally, the reporting person would be either the hired individual or someone from the hiring committee at the hiring school.) If you would like to email information instead of posting it, please send it to Sarah Lawsky at slawsky *at* law *dot* uci *dot* edu. Remember: you can't edit the spreadsheet yourself. To get your information into the spreadsheet, you must either post in the comments or email me.

I will also gather the names of schools that are doing no entry-level hiring this year (that's the second tab on the spreadsheet), so if you know for sure that your school is not doing entry-level hiring, please post that in the comments or email me.

If you see any errors, or if I have incorporated your information into the spreadsheet but you are not yet ready to make it public, please don't hesitate to email me, and I will take care of the problem as soon as I can.

Other links:

This report follows in the tradition of Larry Solum's excellent work over many years. 

2014 initial post, 2014 spreadsheet, 2014 report (with graphs).

2013 initial post, 2013 spreadsheet, 2013 report (with graphs).

2012 initial post, 2012 spreadsheet, 2012 report (with graphs).

2011 initial post, 2011 spreadsheet, 2011 report (with graphs).

All PrawfsBlawg entry level hiring report tagged posts.

[Originally posted 3/2/15]

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on March 2, 2015 at 01:55 PM in Entry Level Hiring Report, Getting a Job on the Law Teaching Market | Permalink | Comments (20)

Tuesday, December 09, 2014

Who Would Hire Kingsfield?

KingsfieldOver the years, it has become widely discussed that seasoned lawyers are continuing to have a tough time with getting hired as law faculty.  It seems that many very experienced lawyers who would offer valuable work experience are, surprisingly, viewed as somehow less desirable candidates than the under-35 set.  With the myriad discussions currently afoot about the importance of graduating “practice-ready” lawyers, aren’t some of the best teachers the ones who have been out in the world using their law degrees, either in practice or in alternative legal careers?  Are seasoned lawyers wasting their time by going on the market?  If Charles W. Kingsfield were on the market today, which schools (if any) would extend him an offer?

Posted by Kelly Anders on December 9, 2014 at 01:28 PM in Entry Level Hiring Report, Getting a Job on the Law Teaching Market, Life of Law Schools, Teaching Law | Permalink | Comments (35)

Tuesday, May 06, 2014

"For Prospective Fellows and VAPs"

The below comment to the hiring report post deserves to be excerpted it in its own post. (The commenter was anonymous--if you are the author of this comment and would like me to credit you in this post, please email me.)

Perhaps the biggest limitation [of this report] is that the denominators of the categories - fellowships, clerkships, advanced degrees, Yale JDs, etc. - are essentially unknown....
So, for example, we see that 85% of those who got a teaching job had at least a fellowship.... But nobody knows how many fellows were on the market this year, so we can't figure out what a prospective fellow would really want to know, which is what percentage of fellows got jobs.... It might be that 25% of fellows got jobs this year, which would be helpful for a prospective fellow to know....
We can say that not having a fellowship is a massive disadvantage, because only 15% of those hired got their jobs without it. But if you're weighing your career options, that doesn't really tell you whether to take a fellowship if you don't know what proportion of fellows are getting jobs.
In short, it would be wise to ask your prospective program about their outcomes, and to do as much research as you can on fellowships that offer a roughly comparable experience (not just eliteness of school, but mentors and support).

(Emphasis added.)

Necessary and sufficient are different, and pay attention to base rates: words to live by!

More specifically, as the commenter suggests, while it would be nice to know the percentage of fellows/VAPs on the market that received jobs, if you're considering taking a fellowship, that isn't too interesting to you. What matters to you is how many fellows from the fellowship you are considering got jobs over the past few years. 

Some fellowship programs (NYU's tax Acting Assistant ProfessorshipChicago's Bigelow program, along with others, I am sure--feel free to provide additional helpful links in the comments!) provide this information right on their web pages in an easy-to-digest fashion, so it's easy to see that they have excellent placement rates. If the fellowship you are considering doesn't provide you with historical placement information, including percentage of fellows hired, you should ask. 

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on May 6, 2014 at 12:43 PM in Entry Level Hiring Report, Getting a Job on the Law Teaching Market | Permalink | Comments (8)

Friday, May 02, 2014

Spring Self-Reported Entry Level Hiring 2014 - JD Schools, All Law Schools

Here is the breakout of what schools hires went to for their initial law degree for all tenure-track law school hires (i.e., not limited to U.S. law schools):

JD School Global.20140502

Yale 20; Harvard 12; Columbia 8; NYU 7; Stanford 6; Chicago 4; Michigan 4; Berkeley 3; Other 17.

Schools in the "other" category with two JD/LLBs who reported hires: Northwestern; UCLA.

Schools in the "other" category with one JD/LLB who reported hires: Ateneo de Manila (Phillipines); Cornell; Duke; Florida State; Fordham;  ITAM (Mexico); North Dakota; Thomas Jefferson; Tulane; Universidad Torcuato Di Tella; Virginia; no JD.

And here is the break-out for all tenure-track hires, whether or not in a law school, and whether or not in the United States:

JDSchoolTenureTrack.20140503

Yale 22; Harvard 12; Columbia 8; NYU 7; Stanford 6; Chicago 5; Michigan 4; Berkeley 3; Other 17.

Schools in the "other" category with two JD/LLBs who reported hires: Northwestern; UCLA.

Schools in the "other" category with one JD/LLB who reported hires: Ateneo de Manila (Phillipines); Cornell; Duke; Florida State; Fordham;  ITAM (Mexico); North Dakota; Thomas Jefferson; Tulane; Universidad Torcuato Di Tella; Virginia; no JD.

Originally posted 5/2/14; edited 5/3/14 to reflect additional hire and to add second graph (of all tenure-track hires); edited 5/4/14, 5/6/14 to reflect three additional hires.

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on May 2, 2014 at 08:09 PM in Entry Level Hiring Report, Getting a Job on the Law Teaching Market | Permalink | Comments (6)

Spring Self-Reported Entry Level Hiring Report 2014 - Men/Women over Time

Orin asked in the comments below about the split between male and female hires over time. Based on a super-quick count of what is, disturbingly, nine years of spreadsheets that I happen to have, here's what I found. I've left out the data labels because I am even less sure than usual of the exactness of the numbers, but they're roughly right as reflections of self-reported hiring each spring (first Solum's reports, then mine). And as always, 2010 is left out due to missing data for that year.

For what it's worth, I consider last year and this year to represent essentially equal splits of men and and women--last year it was 54% men, this year it was 49% men, both in very small pools.

GenderTime.20140502

Edited 5/4/14, 5/6/14 to add two hires and reclassify one person.

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on May 2, 2014 at 07:11 PM in Entry Level Hiring Report, Getting a Job on the Law Teaching Market | Permalink | Comments (1)

Spring Self-Reported Entry Level Hiring Report 2014

Following is a data summary of the Spring Self-Reported Entry Level Hiring Report for 2014. To remain consistent with past years, while the spreadsheet contains all hiring information received, the data analysis includes only tenure-track hires at U.S. law schools.

Here is the spreadsheet:

73 people were reported hired, at [between 50 and 52] different law schools. 

[As of May 1, 2014, two people, one Yale JD and one Harvard JD, are not listed on the spreadsheet but are included in the data. These two people will certainly have jobs this year—the only question is where. Thus I am able to incorporate their information into the analysis below. I will add them to the spreadsheet when they decide where they will be working.]

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions.

Q: 73 self-reported tenure-track hires? What the…?

A: Yes, even worse than last year. (I omit 2010 in this and all subsequent cross-year comparisons because insufficient data was collected that year.)

ReportedHires.20140501

Q: How many reported hires got their JD from School X?

JD School.20140501
Yale 20; Harvard 11; Columbia 8; NYU 6; Chicago 4; Michigan 4; Stanford 3; Berkeley 3; Other 14.

Schools in the "other" category with two JD/LLBs who reported hires: Northwestern; UCLA.

Schools in the "other" category with one JD/LLB who reported hires: Cornell, Duke, Florida State, ITAM (Mexico), North Dakota, Thomas Jefferson, Tulane, Universidad Torcuato Di Tella, Virginia, no JD.

Q: How many reported hires had a fellowship, degree, or clerkship?

61 (about 84%) had a fellowship; 37 (51%) had an advanced degree; 44 (about 60%) had a clerkship.

Venn diagram:

Venn Diagram.20140501

Q: That seems like a lot of fellowships. How does it compare to previous years?

A: It's a lot of fellowships.

FellowshipsOverTime.20140501

Q: Tell me more about these advanced degrees. 

Although some people had more than one advanced degree, the following looks only at what seemed to me to be the "highest" degree someone earned. For example, someone with a Ph.D. and an LL.M. would be counted only as a Ph.D. for purposes of this question. (This tracks the "Other Degree (1)" column.)

That said, the 37 "highest" advanced degrees broke down like this:

AdvDegrees.20140501

D.Phil or Ph.D. 18; D.Phil. (Law), SJD, or JSD 1; LL.M. 4; Masters 13. 

Topics ranged all over the map. For the 19 Ph.D.s, for example: 

PhDSubject.20140501

Q: How long ago did these reported hires get their initial law degrees?

Zero to Four Years (Graduated 2010-2014) 16; Five to Nine Years (Graduated 2005-2009) 37;  Ten to 19 Years (Graduated 1995-2004) 17; Twenty or More Years (Graduated before 1995) 2; Blank 1. The year-by-year break-out is on the spreadsheet ("JD/LLB Year" tab).

YearsSinceHire.20140501

Q: Could you break the reported hires out by men/women?

Men 36 (about 49%); Women 37 (about 51%). (Let's say this is right within +/-2 people.) 

MF.20140501

Q: There were 31% fewer reported hires in 2014 than 2013 (a drop of 33 reported hires, from 106 to 73). How do you account for that drop?

There are a bunch of different ways to think about this. Here I compare the percentage change of various categories to the overall percentage change (click for larger version):

  PercentChange2013.20140502

Notwithstanding the 31% drop in hires compared to 2013, certain raw numbers stayed roughly the same or increased, including PhDs and Yale JDs.

There was a disproportionate drop in hires of people who had fellowships only. While fellowships continue to be extremely common among hires (84% of hires have fellowships), a fellowship was, even more so than in the past, no guarantee of a job. 

Comparing 2014 to 2012, the last pre-contraction year (again, click to enlarge):

PercentChange2012.20140502

Notice the stability in the number of PhDs and Yale JDs, and also the contraction in clerkship-only, degree-only, and fellowship-only hires between 2012 and 2014. 

Q: More slicing! More dicing! Different slicing! Different dicing!

Sure--you can do it yourself, or ask questions in the comments and I'll see what I can do, or we'll work it out as a group.

Q: This is all wrong! I know for a fact that more people from School Y were hired!

Yes, this spreadsheet is certainly missing some information. Repeat: this spreadsheet is incomplete. It represents only those entry-level hires that were reported to me, either through the comments on this blog or via email. It is without question incomplete.

If you want to know about real entry level hiring, I commend to you Brian Leiter's report (hiring 1995-2011), the Katz et al. article (all law professors as of 2008), the George and Yoon article (entry level, 2007-2008 hiring year), and the Tsesis Report (entry level, 2012-2013 hiring year). This is just a report about self-reported entry level hires as of the spring before the school year starts. 

Originally posted 5/2/14; edited 5/4/14, 5/6/14 to add two additional hires and reclassify one person already included in data.

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on May 2, 2014 at 02:57 PM in Entry Level Hiring Report, Getting a Job on the Law Teaching Market | Permalink | Comments (31)

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Entry Level Hiring: The 2014 Report - Final (?) Call for Information

This is, I think, the final call for information for the 2014 Entry Level Hiring Report. I currently plan to close reporting on Thursday, May 1. If, however, you know that there is ongoing hiring (last year, for example, I was told that some schools were working on hiring until mid-May), please let me know, and I will extend that date. Absent any such information, though, I will close the report next Thursday, May 1.

If you have information about entry-level hires for this year, or know that there are outstanding entry-level offers that will not be resolved until after May 1, please either email me directly (slawsky *at* law *dot* uci *dot* edu), or add a comment to the original information-gathering post.

Please encourage anyone you know who has accepted a job but isn't reflected on the spreadsheet to contact me.

As a reminder, I am looking to collect the following information for tenure-track, clinical, or legal writing full-time entry-level hires: 

Basic Information: Name, Hiring School, JD Institution, JD Year of Graduation

Other Degrees: Type of Degree,  Degree Granting Institution, Degree Subject

Fellowship, VAP, or Visiting Professorship: Institution and Type (e.g., VAP, name of fellowship, etc.)

Clerkship: Court (e.g., 9th Circuit, Texas Supreme Court, etc.)

Areas of Speciality (up to four) (if you are a clinical or LRW hire, please list this as your first Area of Specialty)

Type of Position: Tenure Track or Non-Tenure Track (if you are clinical or LRW and also tenure-track, please indicate this)

(Comments are closed on this post in order to drive comments to the original post.)

 

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on April 24, 2014 at 03:38 PM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, April 09, 2014

Entry Level Hiring: The 2014 Report - Second Call for Information

This is a reminder of the Entry Level Hiring Report. The numbers will be low this cycle, but the spreadsheet as it stands as of April 9 is certainly not the final list.

If you have information about entry-level hires for this year, please either email me directly (slawsky *at* law *dot* uci *dot* edu), or add a comment to the original information-gathering post.

Please encourage anyone you know who has accepted a job but isn't reflected on the spreadsheet to contact me.

As a reminder, I am looking to collect the following information for tenure-track, clinical, or legal writing full-time entry-level hires: 

Basic Information: Name, Hiring School, JD Institution, JD Year of Graduation

Other Degrees: Type of Degree,  Degree Granting Institution, Degree Subject

Fellowship, VAP, or Visiting Professorship: Institution and Type (e.g., VAP, name of fellowship, etc.)

Clerkship: Court (e.g., 9th Circuit, Texas Supreme Court, etc.)

Areas of Speciality (up to four) (if you are a clinical or LRW hire, please list this as your first Area of Specialty)

Type of Position: Tenure Track or Non-Tenure Track (if you are clinical or LRW and also tenure-track, please indicate this)

(Comments are closed on this post in order to drive comments to the original post.)

 

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on April 9, 2014 at 10:50 AM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Thursday, March 06, 2014

The 2013 Full Hiring Report

Alexander Tsesis, of Loyola-Chicago Law School, has individually contacted all 180 law schools that are members of the AALS and collected all of the hiring data for entry-level law school hires who began in 2013 (i.e., last year's report: this year will be the 2014 hiring report). 

I run some analysis of this information below, but let's be absolutely clear: all of the work on this project was done by Tsesis, to whom, if you are interested in this sort of thing, you owe a big thanks. (I'll start: Thank you!)Tsesis

Following is a data summary that compares the Spring Self-Reported Entry Level Hiring Report for 2013 (i.e., last year's report) to the full data set for 2013 (last year).

To remain consistent with previous analyses, while the Tsesis data spreadsheet contains all hiring information he received, the data analysis includes only tenure-track hires at U.S. law schools.

In the self-reported version, there were reports of 106 tenure-track hires, at 74 different law schools. The complete data set has 127 tenure-track hires, at 83 law schools. So the self-reported version got about 83% of the new hires.  

We had only two schools have been reported as doing no entry level hiring in 2013. In contrast, the complete data set has 86 schools reported as doing no entry level hiring.

(86 schools did no entry level hiring; 83 schools hired entry-level tenure-track professors, perhaps in addition to non-tenure-track long-term-contract entry-level hires; and 11 schools did not hire entry-level tenure-track professors, but did hire long-term-contract entry-level hires. This is a total of 180 schools.)

The two sets are quite similar. The biggest difference is in the percentage of fellowships: in the self-reported set, 78% of the hires had fellowships, and in the complete data set, 71% have fellowships. 

Compare.20140310

Here are the schools from which people got their JDs in the complete data set, with the increase in number of reports in parentheses. 

Q: How many tenure-track hires in 2013 got their JD from School X?

JD School.20140310

Yale 21 (+4); Harvard 18 (+2); NYU 13 (+1); Chicago 6; Duke 6 (+1); Berkeley 5 (+2); Michigan 5; Northwestern 4 (+1); Virginia 4; Columbia 4 (+2); Cornell 3; Georgetown 3; ; Other 35.

Schools in the "other" category with two JD/LLBs who reported hires: Stanford; Texas; UCLA.

Schools in the "other" category with one JD/LLB who reported hires: American; Boston U; Brooklyn; College of Mgmt Acad Stud; Diego Portales; Duquesne ; Florida; Fordham; George Mason; Hastings; Kansas; Louisana State; Melbourne; Mexico; Miami; Montana; New Mexico; North Carolina; Oklahoma; Penn; Phillipines (U of); Puerto Rico (+1); Russian University; Rutgers-Camden; SMU; Tulane; UC Davis; Washington (St. Louis); West Virginia.

Here is the full spreadsheet. This includes sheets with (1) All tenure-track and long-term clinical hires; (2) tenure track hires only (this is the data on which I ran the comparison, to be consistent with previous reports); (3) a list of schools that did not do entry-level hiring in 2013; and (4) a comparison of the self-reported data and the full data set. Hires that were not on the self-reported sheet are indicated by a  yellow highlight.

Three cheers for Alexander Tsesis!

[Originally posted 3/6/14; edited 3/6/14, 3/7/14 to remove four hires erroneously included; edited 3/9/14 to add one hire erroneously mischaracterized as non-tenure track; edited 3/10/14 to add one clinical and one tenure track hire and to remove Cardozo from non-hiring list.]

Update, 3/7/14: Brian Leiter provides updated placement rates.

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on March 6, 2014 at 04:59 PM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (4) | TrackBack

Monday, March 03, 2014

Entry Level Hiring: The 2014 Report - Call for Information

Time once again for the entry level hiring report.

I will gather the following information for tenure-track, clinical, or legal writing full-time entry-level hires: 

Basic Information: Name, Hiring School, JD Institution, JD Year of Graduation

Other Degrees: Type of Degree,  Degree Granting Institution, Degree Subject

Fellowship, VAP, or Visiting Professorship: Institution and Type (e.g., VAP, name of fellowship, etc.)

Clerkship: Court (e.g., 9th Circuit, Texas Supreme Court, etc.)

Areas of Speciality (up to four) (if you are a clinical or LRW hire, please list this as your first Area of Specialty)

Type of Position: Tenure Track or Non-Tenure Track (if you are clinical or LRW and also tenure-track, please indicate this)

The information will be aggregated on this spreadsheet (which is reproduced below and which you can view and download by clicking on this link); scroll across to see all of the information we will be aggregating. 

Please leave the information in the comments, and, to protect those on the job market, please sign the comment with your real name. (Ideally, the reporting person would be either the hired individual or someone from the hiring committee at the hiring school.) If you would like to email information instead of posting it, please send it to Sarah Lawsky at slawsky *at* law *dot* uci *dot* edu. Remember: you can't edit the spreadsheet yourself. To get your information into the spreadsheet, you must either post in the comments or email me.

We will also gather the names of schools that are doing no entry-level hiring this year (that's the second tab on the spreadsheet), so if you know for sure that your school is not doing entry-level hiring, please post that in the comments or email me.

If you see any errors, or if I have incorporated your information into the spreadsheet but you are not yet ready to make it public, please don't hesitate to email me, and I will take care of the problem as soon as I can.

Other links:

This report follows in the tradition of Larry Solum's excellent work over many years. 

2013 initial post, 2013 spreadsheet, 2013 report (with graphs).

2012 initial post, 2012 spreadsheet, 2012 report (with graphs).

2011 initial post, 2011 spreadsheet, 2011 report (with graphs).

All PrawfsBlawg entry level hiring report tagged posts.

[Originally posted 3/3/14]

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on March 3, 2014 at 09:47 AM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (45) | TrackBack

Monday, December 30, 2013

Law School Hiring, 2013-2014 - Reminder

Please submit information about hiring (e.g., callbacks, a school that isn't hiring, etc.), here, on Thread Two of our Law School Hiring information. The information will be gathered on this spreadsheet.

I will post the "offers" thread, but not until February at the earliest.

[Update, 1/2/14: Link to spreadsheet fixed.]

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on December 30, 2013 at 03:13 PM in Entry Level Hiring Report, Getting a Job on the Law Teaching Market | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Monday, May 27, 2013

Spring Self-Reported Entry Level Hiring Report: Reporting Rate 2013

As last year, I here compare the self-reported placement with the number of alumni from each school on the market this year, as reported on Leiter's Law School Reports last fall. 

The graph below  gives the self-reported hiring rate (the "reporting rate") for tenure-track U.S. law school jobs for each of the schools listed in Leiter's chart. This is calculated by dividing the number of reported tenure-track U.S. law school hires for a given school by the number of alumni from that school on the market this year based on the first FAR distribution, as reported by Leiter.

For example, the SSRELHR (Spring Self-Reported Entry Level Hiring Report) shows that 16 reported hires received their JD from Harvard, and Leiter reports that Harvard had 57 alumni in the first FAR distribution, so Harvard has a rate of 16/57, approximately 28%. 

This is all subject to a lot of caveats, of course--here are four, and I'm sure I'm missing some. There are both numerator and denominator issues: 

(1) Numerator: I don't know whether the apparently "unsuccessful" candidates weren't hired, or were hired but weren't reported to the SSRELHR.

(2) Numerator: Some schools tend to report their alumni to the SSRELHR very faithfully, so the reporting rate might well differ by school.

(3) Numerator: The data analysis includes only tenure-track, U.S. positions. Some people received other sorts of jobs. For example, seven Chicago hires were reported--one at a non-U.S. law school. If that hire were included in the data analysis, the Chicago percentage would go from 6/12 = 50% (already very high) to 7/12=58% (even higher!).

(4) Denominator: The "number of people on the market" is drawn from the first FAR form distributions. There are subsequent, albeit smaller, distributions, and some people hired were not in the FAR pool at all.

Keeping those caveats in mind:

Reporting Rate.20130527

Virginia 4/7 (57%); Chicago 6/12 (50%); Yale 18/37 (49%); NYU 12/31 (39%); Duke 5/13 (38%); Michigan 5/13 (38%); Penn 1/3 (33%); Harvard 16/57 (28%); UCLA 2/8 (25%); Northwestern 3/14 (21%); Cornell 3/14 (21%); Texas 2/11 (18%); Georgetown 3/18 (17%); Stanford 2/13 (15%); Berkeley 3/20 (15%); Columbia 2/18 (11%).

This is also available on the spreadsheet, on the tab labeled "Reporting Rate."

Originally posted 5/27/13; edited 5/28/13 to reflect change in Michigan.

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on May 27, 2013 at 04:27 PM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack

Spring Self-Reported Entry Level Hiring Report 2013

Following is a data summary of the Spring Self-Reported Entry Level Hiring Report for 2013. To remain consistent with past years, while the spreadsheet contains all hiring information received, the data analysis includes only tenure-track hires at U.S. law schools.

Here is the full spreadsheet:

We have reports of 106 people being hired, at 74 different law schools. 

Two schools have been reported as doing no entry level hiring this year.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions:

Q: 106 self-reported tenure-track hires? How does that compare to previous years?

A: Yeah. Not good. (I omit 2010 in this and all subsequent cross-year comparisons because insufficient data was collected that year.)

Reported Hires per Year
Q: How many reported hires got their JD from School X?

School From.20130527

Yale 18; Harvard 16; NYU 12; Chicago 6; Duke 5; Michigan 5; Virginia 4; Cornell 3; Georgetown 3; Northwestern 3; Berkeley 3; Other 26.

Schools in the "other" category with two JD/LLBs who reported hires: Columbia; Texas; Stanford; UCLA.

Schools in the "other" category with one JD/LLB who reported hires: Brooklyn; College of Mgmt Acad Stud; Diego Portales; Fordham; Hastings; Kansas; Louisana State; Melbourne; Miami; Montana; New Mexico; North Carolina; Oklahoma; Penn; Phillipines (U of); Russian University; SMU; Tulane; Washington (St. Louis); West Virginia.

Q: How many reported hires had a fellowship, degree, or clerkship?

83 (about 78%) had a fellowship; 59 (about 56%) had an advanced degree; 53 (about 50%) had a clerkship.

Nonproportional Venn diagram:

Venn Diagram.20130527


Q: That seems like a lot of fellowships. How does it compare to previous years?

A: It's a lot of fellowships.

Fellowship Rate.20130527


Q: Tell me more about these advanced degrees. 

Okay, but first a caveat: Although some people had more than one advanced degree, the following looks only at what seemed to me to be the "highest" degree someone earned. For example, someone with a Ph.D. and an LL.M. would be counted only as a Ph.D. for purposes of this question. (This tracks the "Other Degree (1)" column, for the two people out there who are actually following along on the spreadsheet.)

That said, looking only at what seemed to be the most advanced degree (apologizing in advance for mischaracterizing the relative advancement of anyone's multiple degrees), and including "expected" degrees, the 59 "highest" advanced degrees broke down like this:

LL.M. (or LL.M. expected) 10; Masters (or Masters expected) 23; D.Phil. (Law), SJD, or JSD (or SJD or JSD expected) 6; D.Phil or Ph.D. (or Ph.D. expected) 20.

Adv Degrees.20130527
Topics ranged all over the map. For the 20 Ph.D.s, for example:

PhD Subject.20130527

Q: How long ago did these reported hires get their initial law degrees?

Zero to Four Years (Graduated 2009-2013) 20; Five to Nine Years (Graduated 2004-2008) 59;  Ten to 19 Years (Graduated 1994-2003) 21; Twenty or More Years (Graduated before 1994) 3; Blank 3. The year-by-year break-out is on the spreadsheet ("Years Since Hire" tab).

Year of Grad.20130527
Q: Could you break the reported hires out by men/women?

Women 49 (about 46%); Men 57 (about 54%). (Let's say this is right within +/-2 people.) 

Gender.20130527
Q: Did we learn anything interesting about reported speciality subject areas?

The self-reported entry level hires had diverse specialities--in fact, the hires named 116 different fields of specialty! (I did this differently from the "what kind of degrees" question--here, if someone listed four fields of speciality, I included all four.) 

As for which fields were most popular:

Popular Subjects.20130527
You can see the full list, sortable either by number of people who stated an interest or alphabetically by interest, here (on the tab labeled "Subject Summary").

Q: More slicing! More dicing! Different slicing! Different dicing!

Sure--you can do it yourself, or ask questions in the comments and I'll see what I can do, or we'll work it out as a group.

Q: This is all wrong! I know for a fact that more people from School Y were hired! Plus, you account for only 76 different law schools, and there are over 200!

Yes, this spreadsheet is certainly missing some information. Repeat: this spreadsheet is incomplete. It represents only those entry-level hires that were reported to me, either through the comments on this blog or via email. It is without question incomplete. 

If you want to know about real entry level hiring, I commend to you Brian Leiter's report and the Katz et al. article. This is just a report about self-reported entry level hires as of the spring before the school year starts. 

Q: What does it all mean?

Not much. But it's been fun!  

Originally posted 5/27/13; edited 5/28/13 to reflect misclassified hire from original spreadsheet.

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on May 27, 2013 at 03:10 PM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (15) | TrackBack

Tuesday, May 21, 2013

Entry Level Hiring: The 2013 Report - Final Call for Information (For Real)

This is (honestly) the last call for information for the Entry Level Hiring Report. The data collection will close on Friday, May 24. I am aware that I will miss some hires because of this closing date. C'est la report. (And yes, I am also aware that I do not know French.)

At any rate, if you have information about entry-level hires for this year, please either email me directly (slawsky *at* law *dot* uci *dot* edu), or add a comment to the original information-gathering post.

Please encourage anyone you know who has accepted a job but isn't reflected on the spreadsheet to contact me.

As a reminder, I am looking to collect the following information for tenure-track, clinical, or legal writing full-time entry-level hires: 

Basic Information: Name, Hiring School, JD Institution, JD Year of Graduation

Other Degrees: Type of Degree,  Degree Granting Institution, Degree Subject

Fellowship, VAP, or Visiting Professorship: Institution and Type (e.g., VAP, name of fellowship, etc.)

Clerkship: Court (e.g., 9th Circuit, Texas Supreme Court, etc.)

Areas of Speciality (up to four) (if you are a clinical or LRW hire, please list this as your first Area of Specialty)

Type of Position: Tenure Track or Non-Tenure Track (if you are clinical or LRW and also tenure-track, please indicate this)

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on May 21, 2013 at 11:00 AM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Thursday, April 18, 2013

Er, Not So Final

I claimed earlier today that I was issuing the final call for the entry-leveling hiring report. But I now think it's too early for that--apparently hiring committees at more than one school will be meeting through mid-May. So, not so final. I'll issue the final call in a few weeks. But of course, if you've got the info, post it! Send it!

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on April 18, 2013 at 12:47 PM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Entry Level Hiring: The 2013 Report - Final Call for Information [Update: Not So Final!]

This is the [not-so-]final call for information for the Entry Level Hiring Report. I will close the report on Thursday, April 26 in mid-May. [Update, 4/18/13, 9:42a: I have been advised by several people that hiring at certain schools will be ongoing until mid-May, and I don't want to jump ahead of things when it comes to compiling the information. But still! If you have the information, let me know now! Let's fill up this spreadsheet!]

If you have information about entry-level hires for this year, please either email me directly (slawsky *at* law *dot* uci *dot* edu), or add a comment to the original information-gathering post.

Please encourage anyone you know who has accepted a job but isn't reflected on the spreadsheet to contact me.

As a reminder, I am looking to collect the following information for tenure-track, clinical, or legal writing full-time entry-level hires: 

Basic Information: Name, Hiring School, JD Institution, JD Year of Graduation

Other Degrees: Type of Degree,  Degree Granting Institution, Degree Subject

Fellowship, VAP, or Visiting Professorship: Institution and Type (e.g., VAP, name of fellowship, etc.)

Clerkship: Court (e.g., 9th Circuit, Texas Supreme Court, etc.)

Areas of Speciality (up to four) (if you are a clinical or LRW hire, please list this as your first Area of Specialty)

Type of Position: Tenure Track or Non-Tenure Track (if you are clinical or LRW and also tenure-track, please indicate this)

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on April 18, 2013 at 09:51 AM in Entry Level Hiring Report | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack