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Friday, January 21, 2022

Republicans and conservarives love univeral injunctions now

Again. As if the handwringing and all that legislation was not based on any real commitment to particularity.

Judge Brown tries to play reluctant universalist, citing Gorsuch and Thomas, calling it a product of the "unique facts before it" and the only way to avoid confusion. Nonsense. He offers one fact to justfy universality--the plaintiff, Feds for Medical Freedom, has a lot of members and continues to add more. But like most justifications for universality, this proves too much. Many organizations have a lot of members. Is universality appropriate in all associational standing cases? Only in associational standing cases involving large associations? And if so, what makes an organization large? Feds for Medical Freedom (Except The Other Vaccinations We Had To Take And Blood-And-Urine Samples We Must Provide) has 6000 members*--where does largeness begin? Or is it only large organizations fighting for causes Judge Brown likes?

[*] Does largeness depend on some denominator? The federal workforce is more than 2 million people.

The claim that tailoring relief is not practical is a cop-out. Here is a tailored injunction--"The US cannot enforce the vaccine policy against members of FMFETOVWHTTABAUSWMP." Ordinary rules of equity have the parties and court monitor ongoing compliance with that injunction and adjust the injunction to changing circumstances--identifying group members, litigating attempts to enforce the policy against individuals, and notifying the court of new FMFETOVWHTTABAUSWMP members who gain the protection of the injunction (which does not even require the court to modify the injunction, since the association is the protected party). It makes no sense to preemptively declare that process "unwieldy" and expand the scope of the injunction from the 6000 members to more than 2 million people who are not members.

Don't worry, though. Judge Brown will take a strong stance against universality beginning in 2025.

Posted by Howard Wasserman on January 21, 2022 at 03:50 PM in Civil Procedure, Constitutional thoughts, Howard Wasserman, Judicial Process | Permalink

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