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Saturday, January 22, 2022

District court preliminarily enjoins UF conflicts policy

From Friday. The opinion by Judge Mark Walker is near perfect. He loses a point at the end when the court appears to make the injunction universal by ordering UF to take no steps to enforce the conflicts policy "with respect to faculty and staff requests" to testify or consult on cases, not limited to requests from the plaintiffs. The court denied relief as to the policy prohibiting faculty from including institutional identification when signing amicus briefs, because the court could not determine whether that was a university or a "figment of Dean Rosenbury's imagination."

This is not a good opinion for defendants or their lawyers. The opinion begins by comparing UF to the erosion of academic freedom and free speech at Hong Kong University (including removal of a memorial to the victims of Tiananmen Square) not from overt actions of the Chinese government but from university administrators wanting to keep Beijing happy; footnote 12 adds that "[i]f those in UF's administration find this comparison upsetting, the solution is simple: Stop acting like your contemporaries in Hong Kong." The court emphasized the intemperate statements of the chair of the Board of Trustees, which Walker said "made plain that UF was beholden to the Florida Legislature and that it would not permit its faculty to continue offending lawmakers in Tallahassee." Walker calls out UF's lawyers for: 1) failing to adequately brief Pickering or to recognize Pickering as applicable; 2) trashing the plaintiff professors (who continue to work for their client and to educate the students who pay their client for an education) as traitors, robbers, mercenaries, political hacks, and disobedient liars; and 3) failing to identify UF's interests or how professors' testimony disrupts UF's mission despite four opportunities to do so (including the court continuing argument for a week to give defense counsel an opportunity prepare).

The opinion came on a rough day for the State University System. FIU President Mark Rosenberg resigned out of the blue citing family health reasons, an explanation the Miami Herald eyed with suspicion. This comes a week after FIU's provost resigned. Four Florida universities--FIU, UF, North Florida, and South Florida--are about to enter presidential searches. And the state is considering legislation (when not working on bills compelling the national anthem, prohibiting public-school teachers from talking about LGBTQ+ issue or helping LGBTQ+ kids, and prohibiting teaching historical events that make white people feel bad) that would exempt early stages of presidential searches from sunshine laws. And now a federal court found that the flagship university regards faculty with, at best, contempt.

Posted by Howard Wasserman on January 22, 2022 at 04:29 PM in Civil Procedure, Constitutional thoughts, First Amendment, Judicial Process | Permalink

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