« The Chair | Main | The Myth of the "Switch In Time" »

Tuesday, August 24, 2021

Intellectual Property in Class Notes

To piggyback on the prior post about "The Chair," there is a scene in which a suspended professor is asked to give his class notes to the person who will take over his class. He refuses (then they drop this plot line).

Here's my question: Are class notes a work-for-hire such that the university employer shares a copyright in them with the instructor? I can see the argument that they are. But suppose I taught at University A for ten years and developed my class notes there. I then move to University B and continue using the notes. Would that still be a work-for-hire for University B? Or would that be true only for University A? Or is the point that if I make any modifications to my notes after I move to University B, then the notes are a work-for-hire for University B?

Posted by Gerard Magliocca on August 24, 2021 at 09:07 AM | Permalink

Comments

ในยุคการแพร่ระบาดของเชื่อไวรัสทำให้เกิดผลกระทบเรื่องอื่นๆ มากมายรวมถึงเรื่องการเงิน วันนี้เราจึงขอแนะนำช่องทางที่จะสามารถสร้างรายได้ให้ท่านได้ง่ายๆ นั้นก็คือเกมสล็อต Lucky Neko สมัครสมาชิกได้ที่ [url="https://www.pgslot.to/รีวิว/lucky-neko-slot/"]PGSLOT.TO[/url]
เป็มเกมที่เรียกได้ว่าเป็นนิยมมากที่สุดในขณะนี้ ท่านสามารถทำการศึกษาและอ่านละเอียดเกมเพิ่มเติมเพียงเท่านี้ท่านก็สามารถเล่นเกมสล็อตเนโกะนำโชคได้และหากท่านต้องการฝึกฝนท่านสามารถเข้าไปที่โหมดสาธิตก่อนการลงเดิมพันและสามารถลงเดิมพันได้ตั้งแต่หลักหน่วยเป็นต้นไป

Posted by: Arya Panatee | Aug 30, 2021 8:38:01 AM

ในยุดการแพร่ระบาดของเชื่อไวรัสทำให้เกิดผลกระทบเรื่องอื่นๆ มากมายรวมถึงเรื่องการเงิน วันนี้เราจึงขอแนะนำช่องทางที่จะสามารถสร้างรายได้ให้ท่านได้ง่ายๆ นั้นก็คือเกมสล็อต Lucky Neko สมัครสมาชิกได้ที่ PGSLOT.TO เป็มเกมที่เรียกได้ว่าเป็นนิยมมากที่สุดในขณะนี้ ท่านสามารถทำการศึกษาและอ่านละเอียดเกมเพิ่มเติมเพียงเท่านี้ท่านก็สามารถเล่นเกมสล็อตเนโกะนำโชคได้และหากท่านต้องการฝึกฝนท่านสามารถเข้าไปที่โหมดสาธิตก่อนการลงเดิมพันและสามารถลงเดิมพันได้ตั้งแต่หลักหน่วยเป็นต้นไป

Posted by: Arya Panatee | Aug 30, 2021 8:36:14 AM

ในยุดการแพร่ระบาดของเชื่อไวรัสทำให้เกิดผลกระทบเรื่องอื่นๆ มากมายรวมถึงเรื่องการเงิน วันนี้เราจึงขอแนะนำช่องทางที่จะสามารถสร้างรายได้ให้ท่านได้ง่ายๆ นั้นก็คือเกมสล็อต Lucky Neko สมัครสมาชิกได้ที่ PGSLOT.TO เป็มเกมที่เรียกได้ว่าเป็นนิยมมากที่สุดในขณะนี้ ท่านสามารถทำการศึกษาและอ่านละเอียดเกมเพิ่มเติมเพียงเท่านี้ท่านก็สามารถเล่นเกมสล็อตเนโกะนำโชคได้และหากท่านต้องการฝึกฝนท่านสามารถเข้าไปที่โหมดสาธิตก่อนการลงเดิมพันและสามารถลงเดิมพันได้ตั้งแต่หลักหน่วยเป็นต้นไป

Posted by: Arya Panatee | Aug 30, 2021 8:35:22 AM

Unless you believe the "teacher exemption" survived the 1976 Act (which I don't, but the 7th Circuit seemed open to it), then all works created by professors within the scope of their employment, including class notes (and books and articles) are works made for hire owned by the university. The key question is whether the parties have agreed in writing NOT to make them WFH -- typically by a reference in the annual contract to the university's IP Policy. So the question is what the University's IP Policy says -- does it carve out class notes, or just research (or nothing, because everyone thinks IP only means patents and so this issue is just lying around dormant until the university suddenly wakes up and wants to claim ownership of something)?

Posted by: Bruce Boyden | Aug 24, 2021 2:19:10 PM

The scene jumped out at us as well, with both saying "no, that can't happen." Especially when the chair of the department went into the office and rifled through his papers to find the notes. (Sidenote: My dean would be in my office for ten hours and probably still could not find or understand the correct notes).

How would principles of academic freedom play into this? The school cannot tell me how (other than in very broad strokes) to teach my class. If it cannot control the content of my course, it would not make sense for it to own or control the notes and other materials that I use to control my course.

Posted by: Howard Wasserman | Aug 24, 2021 1:10:29 PM

Typo above, it should be "former" not "latter" in the second sentence.

Posted by: kotodama | Aug 24, 2021 11:19:07 AM

For one, a WFH is not "shared" between employer and employee. The latter is the sole owner. That's the whole point of WFH.

Certainly there's an argument to be made, but if you look it at from the perspective of CCNV v. Reid, course notes would seem to fall easily on the side of not a WFH. You can also reach the same conclusion by comparing to prototypical cases where a WFH was found. For example, articles written by staff reporters, source code written by employee programmers, etc.

From a practical perspective, is there any trend of professors and/or universities actually registering copyrights in course notes? It wouldn't be dispositive of course, but it would be some evidence of how they view the copyright status. I haven't checked personally, but I can imagine it doesn't happen that frequently, if at all.

Also, such issues at universities would be addressed (one hopes at least) via agreement beforehand. Searching quickly on Google shows a sample IP policy promulgated by AAUP states that course notes are owned by faculty. I don't know to what extent that policy is used or adopted, but it looks sensible to meet and jives with my discussion above.

But if we assume WFH for purposes of the OP's hypo, then University B/the relocated professor are infringing University A's copyright. And the subsequent modifications are just an infringing derivative work, not a separate WFH belonging to University B.

I think a more interesting way to look at it—the course notes—from the IP perspective is as trade secrets though, not copyright.

Posted by: kotodama | Aug 24, 2021 11:18:44 AM

The comments to this entry are closed.