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Sunday, December 16, 2018

Sad law-prof blogging news

Concurring Opinions is shutting down at the end of the year. This is sad news. CoOp spun out of Prawfs in its earliest days and I experienced them (as reader and then as author/guest-author) as companion sites, covering similar issues of law and legal education with a similar sensibility. The posts containing the table of contents from new issues of law reviews will be missed. And this closing reflects the broader migration of this sort of legal writing to Twitter and Facebook.

Gerard indicated that there would be some farewell posts over the next two weeks.

Posted by Howard Wasserman on December 16, 2018 at 10:31 AM in Blogging, Howard Wasserman, Teaching Law | Permalink

Comments

Oh, thanks, Orin. Fortunately for me, I suppose, legal nerds are fairly low on my list of intended audiences for my blogposts.

Posted by: Marty Lederman | Dec 17, 2018 6:13:58 AM

Marty writes: "What's an example, Orin, of a case or piece of legislation or presidential action that has been less covered in the blogosphere lately than it would have been a few years ago? Or any substantive twitter discussion that's as valuable as a blog discussion it might have displaced?"

I don't think that Twitter discussions are more valuable than blog discussions; I think the opposite is typically true. And certainly, in the age of Trump, there has been a lot of coverage of Presidential action and related legislation. Rather, I'm reflecting on my sense that blogs seem to be less at the center of conversations among legal nerds than they used to be. There was a run of around a decade during which legal blogs had a big role in defining the conversation among legal nerds. A lot of legal nerds kept up with a set of legal blogs as sort of the daily commentary on the law. My sense is that there has been a shift. Legal blogs still exist, and still have lots of great content. But my sense is that they're not as central to the law nerd conversation as they were a while back.

Posted by: Orin Kerr | Dec 17, 2018 5:51:14 AM

Dave Hoffman, listed as a contributor, apparently hasn't blogged at CoOp since 2015. Yet he's a regular at Twitter. So, while I was never a regular CoOp reader, I'd say that anything that Dave was likely to cover may now receive better coverage on Twitter than on CoOp.

Posted by: CoOp | Dec 16, 2018 10:05:48 PM

What's an example, Orin, of a case or piece of legislation or presidential action that has been less covered in the blogosphere lately than it would have been a few years ago? Or any substantive twitter discussion that's as valuable as a blog discussion it might have displaced?

I'm not saying you're wrong -- only that I haven't noticed it.

Posted by: Marty Lederman | Dec 16, 2018 6:23:15 PM

To add to what Howard says, in response to Marty, I do think law blogs are less at the center of conversations among legal nerds than they were a decade ago -- and that a lot of it has moved to Twitter, for better or worse.

Posted by: Orin Kerr | Dec 16, 2018 5:11:22 PM

Sorry; I was imprecise. I should have said "a lot" of this writing has migrated. Sites such as Balkin (where you write) and Volokh are going strong, as are relative newcomers such as Take Care. But there seem to be fewer of these, at least among the professoriate, than 5-10 years ago.

Posted by: Howard Wasserman | Dec 16, 2018 10:58:48 AM

"This sort" of legal writing has migrated to twitter and FB? How so? Did I not receive the memo?

Posted by: Marty Lederman | Dec 16, 2018 10:53:16 AM

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