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Monday, April 25, 2016

The Future of Predictive Policing

The Wall Street Journal has an interesting, if reductive debate on the value of predictive policing out today.  Is Predictive Policing the Law Enforcement Tactic of the Future? http://www.wsj.com/articles/is-predictive-policing-the-law-enforcement-tactic-of-the-future-1461550190.

I have been writing about the subject for a few years now, exploring first the Fourth Amendment impacts of the technology, and then the larger doctrinal impacts of big data policing.  The issues are fascinating will soon be coming to a courtroom near you. 

My latest article – Policing Predictive Policing – is just up on SSRN this week.  It avoids the binary (good/bad) choice suggested by the WSJ debate, and seeks to situate the predictive policing debate within the work of scholars who have been thinking about predictive technologies for decades now. 

For people curious about the issue, the subject of predictive policing will be a topic of discussion at the May 12-13 Penn Law Quattrone Center Symposium.  https://www.law.upenn.edu/newsevents/calendar.php#event_id/52170/view/event.  It was also a focus of Alvaro Bedoya and Paul Butler’s wonderfully successful Georgetown Law symposium this month on The Color of Surveillance

Any thoughts on the draft article are welcome. 

Posted by Andrew Guthrie Ferguson on April 25, 2016 at 10:57 AM | Permalink

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