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Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Boston University Law Review Symposium on Dworkin's "Religion Without God"

The Boston University Law Review in recent years has done a superb job of running symposia on new and important legal books. Many of us have lamented the decline in the number of book reviews in legal periodicals, a decline that has corresponded to a rise in the number of books published by law professors in the last decade or so. BU has filled that gap admirably, and sparked some terrific conversations as a result. 

The new issue of the Boston University Law Review has two such symposia, on three different books. I was delighted to be rather distantly involved in one of those, a print symposium on the late Ronald Dworkin's book Religion Without God. The symposium can be found here. Notwithstanding my own contribution, it's really a stellar gathering, thanks to the work of Professor Jim Fleming, and I found the pieces well worth reading. The table of contents follows:

Volume 94, Number 4 – July 2014

CONTENTS

A SYMPOSIUM ON RONALD DWORKIN’S RELIGION WITHOUT GOD

Introduction to the Symposium on Ronald Dworkin’s Religion Without God James E. Fleming Page 1201

Religion Without God by Ronald Dworkin – Review Jeremy Waldron Page 1207

The Challenge of Belief Stephen L. Carter Page 1213

“A Troublesome Right”: The “Law” in Dworkin’s Treatment of Law and Religion Paul Horwitz Page 1225

Ronald Dworkin, Religion, and Neutrality Andrew Koppelman Page 1241

Dworkin’s Freedom of Religion Without God Cécile Laborde Page 1255

Can Religion Without God Lead to Religious Liberty Without Conflict? Linda C. McClain Page 1273

Religion, Equality, and Public Reason Micah Schwartzman Page 1321

Is God Irrelevant? Steven D. Smith Page 1339

 

Posted by Paul Horwitz on September 10, 2014 at 04:57 PM in Paul Horwitz | Permalink

Comments

Ultimately, though I think his attempt to define "religion" broadly made sense (e.g., in "Life's Dominion" he argued that the right to choose an abortion could rest of religious freedom over basic questions of life and death), I was disappointed with the end result here. Perhaps, if he had more time to edit it.

Posted by: Joe | Sep 12, 2014 10:42:52 AM

Pardon me, "Paul." But what did you do with the real Paul Horwitz?

Posted by: Dalvino | Sep 10, 2014 5:26:50 PM

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