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Friday, October 27, 2006

Research Canons: Comparative Law

Our next subject matter for the research canons project is Comparative Law.  (See here for a discussion of the research canons project.)  Please comment on the books and articles that are essential to a new academic in the field.

This is our last installment.  We'll have a wrap-up of the canons project next week.

Update: Patrick O'Donnell has contributed his extensive bibliography here.

Posted by Matt Bodie on October 27, 2006 at 10:40 AM in Research Canons | Permalink

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Comments

Hey,
I m looking for this kind of research canons and today I got it.

Posted by: Dhaval Patel | Nov 2, 2018 7:06:12 AM

Hey,
I m looking for this kind of research canons and today I got it.

Posted by: Dhaval Patel | Nov 2, 2018 7:06:04 AM

This type of the technology bring the big revolution in the computer system and deal with it. If you try to understand it in the language of technique then we can say it is easy foe the use.

Posted by: partitioning hard drive windows 10 | Oct 21, 2018 6:05:55 AM

Thanks so much for adding this one!

My list includes the following, though I know there are other important source, and I really look forward to the comments of real experts in this field:

Harold J. Berman, Law and Revolution: The Formation of the Western Legal Tradition (1983);
Paul Brand, The Origins of the English Legal Profession (1992);
John P. Dawson, The Oracles of the Law (1968);
Charles Sumner Lobingier, The Continuity of Roman Law in the East, 4 Tulane L. Rev. 341 (1930);
Theodore F.T. Plucknett, A Concise History of the Common Law (5th ed. 1956);
Roscoe Pound, The Lawyer From Antiquity to Modern Times (1953);
O.F. Robinson et al., An Introduction to European Legal History (1985);
Peter Stein, Roman Law in European History (1999);
Zweigert & Kotz, An Introduction to Comparative Law (3rd ed., Tony Weir trans. 1998);
H Patrick Glenn, Legal Traditions of the World (2nd ed. 2004); and
Sir Basil Markesinis, Comparative Law in the Courtroom and the Classroom (Hart 2003).

Posted by: Jason Kilborn | Oct 27, 2006 11:03:34 AM

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