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Tuesday, September 12, 2006

Luban on the future of law reviews

Over at Balkinization, David Luban has posted a very interesting comment in response to Jack Balkin's recent essay in the Yale Pocket Part addressing the impact of blogging on legal scholarship.  Here's a slice:

At that point, perhaps only a few years down the road, the question whether hiring committees should count blogging as legal scholarship might transmute into the question whether hiring committees should count law review articles as legal scholarship. If the best students and many scholars perceive the action shifting to cyberspace, law reviews will become less important repositories of at least one variety of scholarly ambition. Law reviews will concentrate on interdisciplinary, fancy-theoretical scholarship relatively disconnected from the flow of real-time political and legal events.

We are living - and writing - in interesting times indeed (from a legal scholarship point of view, at any rate).

Posted by Bobby Chesney on September 12, 2006 at 11:51 AM | Permalink

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Comments

"Law reviews will concentrate on interdisciplinary, fancy-theoretical scholarship relatively disconnected from the flow of real-time political and legal events."

Is that a prediction, or a statement of the status quo?

Posted by: andy | Sep 12, 2006 5:27:26 PM

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