« The Ansari Incident and Preposterous Role of “Consent” in Liberal Political Theory | Main | Say It Isn’t So, Tim »

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Argument recap in Hall v. Hall (Updated)

My SCOTUSBlog recap of the argument in Hall v. Hall is available. I think it will be the rout I expected. Petitioner's counsel did well and the Justices asked pointed questions and seemed dubious about aspects of both sides. But I think the respondent has the better of this because consolidation must mean something unique.

Update: Two additional thoughts.

Petitioner's counsel suggested a rule that reflects how I sometimes teach this material: Cases can be consolidated for all purposes only if the parties could have joined them in one action at the outset; if so, they become a single case requiring one final judgment. Otherwise, joinder is for limited purposes, the cases are not merged, and remain separate for finality. I teach this is how some courts approach consolidation, since 42(a) should not be allowed to override party choice in framing a case. Respondent's argument is that this may not help petitioner because the consolidation was for all purposes and petitioner waived the argument by not challenging or appealing the consolidation.

This case offers a good hypothetical on the various forms of joinder and their limits, an issue Ginsburg probed a bit at argument. The original lawsuit was brought by Ethlyn, their mother, against Samuel; when Ethlyn died, Elsa became plaintiff as executrix of the Ethlyn's estate. Samuel tried to bring his alienation-of-affection claim against Elsa as a counterclaim, but could not because Elsa in her individual capacity was not the plaintiff, so they were not opposing parties. Samuel likely considered impleading Elsa in her individual capacity, but could not, because the alienation claim was not contingent on the estate claims. All that was left was a separate lawsuit.

Posted by Howard Wasserman on January 16, 2018 at 09:31 PM in Civil Procedure, Howard Wasserman | Permalink

Comments

I predict that Ginsburg, at least, will vote for the petitioner, and I think it's possible that she has some outsized influence at conference on these issues. But the petitioner definitely didn't seem to be getting Kagan, and probably not Roberts.

Posted by: Asher Steinberg | Jan 17, 2018 1:23:30 PM

Post a comment