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Friday, August 18, 2017

Trick plays and baseball rules

This is a great story about a trick play in a high-school baseball game. Called the "skunk in the outfield," the play arises with runners on first-and-third. The runner on first walks into right field, hoping to confuse the defense into doing something stupid about that runner, allowing the runner on third to score. It did not work, because the defense kept its cool. It instead produce a 152-second standoff, an ongoing "play" on which nothing happened and no one moved--one fielder stood with the ball and stared at the runner standing in right field. And everyone--players and fans--became increasingly angry.

Posted by Howard Wasserman on August 18, 2017 at 10:44 PM in Howard Wasserman, Sports | Permalink

Comments

I love especially this part of the story:

"The trick plays book had ways to defend the skunk play. The most ingenious defense is a huddle play, where the pitcher, second baseman and shortstop all huddle near the mound. One of them takes the ball, but the offense can't see which one. Then the shortstop goes toward the runner on third, and the second baseman goes toward the runner in right field. Both runners have to retreat, not knowing whether they're in danger of being tagged out."

Posted by: Anthony Cerminaro | Aug 20, 2017 6:20:28 PM

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