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Tuesday, August 08, 2017

SEALS faculty recruitment

SEALS is considering whether to establish a faculty recruitment conference for member and affiliated schools.* Details--whether it should be for laterals, entry-levels, or both; whether it should be in conjunction with the August annual meeting--are yet to be hashed out. The organization will appoint a committee to study the question.

[*] Motto: "Every school is southeast of somewhere."

Faculty at member and affiliated schools who are interested in serving on the committee can contact Russ Weaver at Louisville. If you have thoughts on the idea and how to implement it, leave them in the comments.

Posted by Howard Wasserman on August 8, 2017 at 09:31 AM in Howard Wasserman, Life of Law Schools, Teaching Law | Permalink

Comments

Dave Hoffman has some interesting thoughts on this over on Twitter: https://twitter.com/HoffProf/status/894917883591102464

Posted by: CBHessick | Aug 8, 2017 12:57:11 PM

I like the idea. I've served as hiring chair at USD law in the past few years and in years when we are not sure if we will be hiring at all, we've cut the travel to DC for the meat market. A hiring meeting that is part of an academic conference will be a better fit in such years, although the question would be how to fund it on the interviewee side, especially for entry-level candidates.

Posted by: Orly Lobel | Aug 9, 2017 12:28:04 PM

I might suggest combining the law meat market with the AALS annual meeting in January. This is how it is done in several other fields. For example, the economics meat market takes place at the ASSA annual meeting.

Posted by: Josh Teitelbaum | Aug 9, 2017 1:41:00 PM

I think it would be very nice to focus more on the mid-career laterals than the entry-level markets, if SEALS is looking for a market in need of repair. Too many opportunities are handled word-of-mouth which prevents both transparency in HR and prevents some excellent candidates from learning of the positions. A more open process is probably healthier all around.

Posted by: AnonProf | Aug 12, 2017 8:41:27 AM

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