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Monday, May 22, 2017

Police in changing communities

Some good stuff in this lengthy Buzzfeed piece on the tensions between the (overwhelmingly white) police and the increasing Black and minority communities in Troy, New York. Two items to pull out that are common in these types of stories, but illustrate some things I have been thinking about:

1) Describing the cycle that multiple incidents followed: "a stop for a low-level infraction; an interaction that escalates; use of force by officers; a charge of resisting arrest, dismissed by prosecutors or acquitted at trial; and then a lawsuit settlement with the city that allows officers to deny the allegations of misconduct." And four officers involved in multiple incidents remain on the police force. And the city works these (relatively small) settlements into the cost of doing business, so civil damages litigation produces no political or accountability pressure to change its policies or the behavior of its officers.

2) Among the reforms the chief of police proposed were dashcams, which were opposed by the union and ultimately rejected. Again, a common reaction--police unions are the one stakeholder not enamored of cameras and many unions are going in the opposite direction of moving away from initial support.

Posted by Howard Wasserman on May 22, 2017 at 08:06 AM in Howard Wasserman, Law and Politics | Permalink

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