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Monday, July 25, 2016

Submission Angsting Fall 2016

This is the post to share information or ask questions about submitting to law reviews.

The comments can be used to share information, complaints, praise, etc. about which journals you have heard from, which you have not, and so forth.

Additionally, a spreadsheet to gather information is here (and embedded below).

I won't update or watch the spreadsheet. You can go ahead and add your own information by going to the spreadsheet here. The spreadsheet is editable by anyone, except that a few columns and a row (the ones highlighted in yellow) are locked, either because they auto-calculate or because tampering with them has caused a problem in the past. (If something about them needs to be changed post a comment, and I will change them.) As more information is added, I will do some pointless data calculations on subsequent sheets.

Entering information in the column entitled "Username" is of course totally optional, but a way to make keeping track easier. For example, if you pick a username, you will easily be able to sort by your entries and update them, instead of trying to remember what day you submitted and sorting that way. This also adds information -- showing, for example, that all of the entries on the spreadsheet come from one person, or from lots of people, etc. At any rate, totally optional, and simply a way to add more information.

Rostron & Levit's extremely helpful guide to submitting to law reviews is available here (this is the July 2016 version). Rostron and Levit have also posted a list of links to law review websites.

Here is the final page of comments.

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on July 25, 2016 at 10:59 AM in Law Review Review | Permalink

Comments

Any general thoughts on timing for the fall cycle? I've always submitted in the February cycle, which has a more clearly defined timeline. I have an article that is ready to submit, but I don't want to pull the trigger too early and not receive a full review from law reviews that have not yet returned from summer break. I also don't want to submit too late.

Posted by: newlawprof | Jul 25, 2016 3:07:06 PM

Timing during the fall cycle is tricky. For one thing, there are far fewer slots available. A number of journals don't even open for the fall cycle anymore. And those that do accept submissions during the fall may only have one or two slots left. Further complicating this, journals are sometimes looking to fill these remaining slots with a subject that was not already covered during their spring cycle. So you may send in a great article, but if a journal has already accepted an article on a similar topic in the spring, you're simply out of luck. Also, because journals have so few slots to fill, they sometimes close after being open for only a short period of time (in some cases, as short as a week or two). So while many people suggest submitting around the middle of the spring cycle (arguing that you're better off waiting until the editors have "seen what's out there"), I'm not sure you can be similarly patient during the fall cycle. If you wait too long, a number of journals may have already accepted their last few articles.

All of this is to say that I think the fall cycle is more difficult to predict.

Posted by: just.another.prof | Jul 25, 2016 4:15:58 PM

I submitted around Aug. 1 last year and had higher ranked acceptances than when I submitte in February. And I think that my February submission was much better.

Posted by: prof | Jul 25, 2016 7:03:48 PM

Is there a strong sense that it's either ok or not ok to submit different articles to the same journal during the same cycle? (And I really mean the *same* journal... not even "X Law Rev and X Law Rev Online/Supplement.") Most of the earlier angsting thread advice I've come across has to do with managing a single article across multiple cycles, but (as of right now) that's not what I'm trying to figure out.

Posted by: So&So | Jul 25, 2016 8:30:01 PM

So&So: It's perfectly ok, imho, but sometimes confusing if both articles are under consideration at the same time. I've had rejections for one piece when the journal had actually read the other (discovered when I expected the other...), confusion about which article I want expedited, and so on. Maybe you are smart enough to figure out how to avoid those problems, but I haven't. My best idea is to close out the process on one piece before submitting the second, which doesn't work so well in the shorter Fall season. Good luck!

Posted by: BDG | Jul 26, 2016 10:51:37 AM

Fair enough -- those are exactly the kinds of issues I was worried about. I'll think about which one has a longer shelf life and pull/submit accordingly.

Posted by: So&So | Jul 26, 2016 11:27:07 AM

This question has probably been asked before, but I cannot unearth an answer from prior submission pages...Should I change the title of an article that I submitted last cycle but am trying this cycle for a better placement? Do the editors throw it out if they recognize your title or do they give it a fair shot? Do they even notice?

Posted by: L | Jul 26, 2016 6:56:45 PM

L: Great question. I have a similar one. I submitted a draft to about 20 journals earlier this month under one title (got no responses, as it was likely too early), made tons of revisions and shortened it significantly, then retitled it and am resubmitting now. Will the journals where I submitted the earlier draft notice/care/be annoyed or should I not even worry?

Posted by: omar little | Jul 26, 2016 7:07:29 PM

Omar Little: we will need to wait for some feedback to the re-titling question, but in the meantime did you withdraw your first submission? That way you at least have the issue of them reading both versions (since both might be in the docket, so to speak).

Posted by: L | Jul 26, 2016 8:26:02 PM

L: yup. I withdrew the earlier version. Hopefully no one will notice and it won't matter.

Posted by: Omar Little | Jul 26, 2016 9:39:27 PM

Are law reviews even reading articles at this point? Many of the journals are not even accepting submissions on Scholastica or Expresso.

Posted by: prof | Jul 26, 2016 10:02:29 PM

A few are. Or, at least, a few are rejecting articles. Whether they actually read the articles is a matter of speculation and cynicism.

Posted by: YesterdayIKilledAMammoth | Jul 26, 2016 10:25:16 PM

I've had dings from YLS, SLS, and BYU. Crickets from all others.

Posted by: Omar Little | Jul 26, 2016 10:38:26 PM

So far, I've only had one ding, and it was from Chicago.

Posted by: AnonProf | Jul 26, 2016 10:45:05 PM

I submitted last week to the relevant law reviews/journals that were accepting (about 30). Most have been silent, but today I received an offer from a lower T50 law review and one of the top 5 specialty journals in my field. The deadlines for each are in the middle of next week. I now regret submitting so early, because it sounds like many of the law reviews are not yet reading submissions. Do I expedite and accept one of the two offers if I don't hear from other journals by next week? (And if so, which one?). Or do I just decline both offers and take my chances that I get a better acceptance when more of the journals begin reviewing articles next month?

Posted by: anon | Jul 27, 2016 12:45:15 PM

anon: I'd expedite and see what happens. A good number of journals will open up on Monday and may be able to make the deadline. Ultimately, if you are stuck w/an offer you don't want, then you can always decline and hope for something better. Another option is asking the law reviews for more time -- maybe until 8/12. It doesn't hurt to ask.

Posted by: omar little | Jul 27, 2016 1:30:44 PM

I see that Yale and Stanford law reviews require authors to delete their identifying information before submitting. Are their reviews entirely blind?

Posted by: anon | Jul 27, 2016 2:04:17 PM

anon: my understanding is that y/h/s are blind for the initial screening and when sent out for peer review but that by the time of board review, the authors are identified. But I could have this wrong....

Posted by: omar little | Jul 27, 2016 2:50:12 PM

anon: my understanding is that y/h/s are blind for the initial screening and when sent out for peer review but that by the time of board review, the authors are identified. But I could have this wrong....

Posted by: omar little | Jul 27, 2016 2:50:26 PM

Is it reasonably possible for an article to be published in a T14 law review if it was not written by a law school professor?

Posted by: Anonymous | Jul 28, 2016 8:11:14 AM

"Ultimately, if you are stuck w/an offer you don't want, then you can always decline and hope for something better."

I'm not sure what this means exactly, but I'll say that I've always considered a submission to a journal as being with the understanding that publishing with the journal is something that I want. Submitting to a journal simply for leverage strikes me as bad form.

Posted by: Scott Dodson | Jul 28, 2016 4:40:25 PM

"Submitting to a journal simply for leverage strikes me as bad form."

Don't hate the player, hate the game! This whole process is built on expediting.

Posted by: AnonProf | Jul 28, 2016 4:58:59 PM

I would tell the guy not to worry about bad form. The editorial boards turn over; they go off to jobs and never give you a second thought. Yes, they may curse you in the moment, but they'll forget you by the next week. The sucks enough without shackling yourself with extra rules.

Posted by: YesterdayIKilledAMammoth | Jul 29, 2016 1:34:17 AM

How long do law reviews and journals take to render a decision in the fall cycle? Is no news good news?

Posted by: anonymous | Jul 29, 2016 9:14:13 AM

No news is GREAT news at this point!

Posted by: AnonProf | Jul 29, 2016 9:31:24 AM

I still think that, even among the journals that are open on Scholastica, the strong majority are not reviewing submissions at this point. We probably have another week or two before journals really start making any decisions.

Posted by: ghl | Jul 29, 2016 12:15:29 PM

Some journals are moving. I submitted on Monday and have received one offer and two rejections. (The rejections came within 12 hours of my expedite request).

Posted by: anon | Jul 29, 2016 12:37:29 PM

anon @ 12:37: What rank of journal? My sense (which totally could be wrong) is that some lower ranked flagships (say 50-100+) and many specialties are actively trying to fill their volume right now. But there doesn't appear to be much action at the top 30-40 flagship journals right now.

Posted by: ghl | Jul 29, 2016 12:57:06 PM

~40 main law review.

Posted by: anon | Jul 29, 2016 12:59:46 PM

Is anybody that's heard from journals actually putting their information in the spreadsheet?

Posted by: YesterdayIKilledAMammoth | Jul 29, 2016 1:09:33 PM

I've tried to enter information, but it won't let me -- says I only have access to read it.

Posted by: AnonProf | Jul 29, 2016 1:25:06 PM

Whoops - sorry! I think I've fixed it now so you can edit. Please let me know if it's still not working.

Posted by: Sarah Lawsky | Jul 29, 2016 1:30:55 PM

Sarah, it's fixed now -- thank you!

Posted by: AnonProf | Jul 29, 2016 2:04:46 PM

Someone posted on the spreadsheet that they'd been rejected by Hastings; however, Hastings isn't even open for submissions yet. Would that person mind chiming in here and explaining? Thank you!

Posted by: AnonProf | Jul 29, 2016 4:54:38 PM

That was me. Didn't notice that the rejection was for different article from spring cycle. Maybe they're clearing out things to get started again.

Posted by: HastingsAnon | Jul 29, 2016 5:02:44 PM

Ah! Well, that explains it -- thanks so much!

Posted by: AnonProf | Jul 29, 2016 5:14:13 PM

Anyone hear over the weekend? Silence here.

Posted by: Anonymous | Aug 1, 2016 9:09:07 AM

Other than a ding from Stanford on Saturday, nada!

Posted by: AnonProf | Aug 1, 2016 9:33:59 AM

rejections from washburn law, mercer law, university of richmond law, and washington international law over the weekend.

Posted by: cheesesticks! | Aug 1, 2016 9:56:05 AM

Cheesesticks-when did you submit?

Posted by: Anonymous | Aug 1, 2016 10:20:53 AM

I submitted to most on July 28th, I submitted to Washington Intl Law on July 15.

Posted by: cheesesticks! | Aug 1, 2016 10:30:56 AM

Crickets. Sigh.

Posted by: So&So | Aug 1, 2016 11:32:08 AM

Crickets are good.

Posted by: Anonymous | Aug 1, 2016 1:08:45 PM

Ding from Yale Law Journal. Feeling pretty prestigious just to get an email from them.

Posted by: Anonymous | Aug 1, 2016 6:21:17 PM

Submitted to about 30 journals between 7/28 and today and nothing but crickets. Anyone else getting any action?

Posted by: omar little | Aug 1, 2016 9:48:47 PM

I have offers on two different articles, both expedited from multiple offers from other journals. The pending offers are from T60 and T90 flagships. I submitted starting 7/15.

Posted by: Tim Riggins | Aug 1, 2016 10:29:57 PM

I received two offers in the past day. One from a T50-60 general law review, and one from one of the top 3 specialty law journals. Thoughts on which is better?

Posted by: Anon | Aug 2, 2016 8:02:23 AM

There are different ways to think about it. For me, the most important is to decide who I hope will read the article. If I am really hoping to reach colleagues in my field, and not much beyond, then I would take the offer from the top 5 specialty journal, which has a good chance of being read regularly by lots of scholars in the field (who might not see the piece if published in a main-line law rev) If the piece contains important themes that transcend the specialty categories, then I might go for the main-line law journal.

Another way to look at it is from the perspective of the Dean's/faculty's review criteria at your school. Will one type of publication "count" more than another in terms of future research grants etc.?

Hopefully both considerations will pull in the same direction for you!

Posted by: crimprof | Aug 2, 2016 8:55:42 AM

BYU just informed me that they are full.

Posted by: AnonProf | Aug 2, 2016 12:44:00 PM

12 minute rejection from Cardozo. Is that a record?

Posted by: Alex | Aug 2, 2016 6:57:39 PM

Deafening silence for those of us up for tenure soon.

Posted by: Anon | Aug 2, 2016 9:39:41 PM

Ding from Michigan state

Posted by: I.F | Aug 2, 2016 10:10:58 PM

And for those of us going on the market!

Posted by: CHEESESTICKS! | Aug 2, 2016 10:11:56 PM

Rejection from northern Illinois.

Posted by: CHEESESTICKS! | Aug 2, 2016 10:23:21 PM

Any tips for an asst law professor in a business school, where the tenure committee consists entirely of people who are accustomed to peer review? I have managed to publish in the few peer-reviewed journals in my field. I would love to publish in a general law review but am worried that it won't "count." Academics in other fields understandably think the law review system is silly.

Posted by: Anon | Aug 3, 2016 5:40:06 AM

Any tips for an asst law professor in a business school, where the tenure committee consists entirely of people who are accustomed to peer review? I have managed to publish in the few peer-reviewed journals in my field. I would love to publish in a general law review but am worried that it won't "count." Academics in other fields understandably think the law review system is silly.

Posted by: Anon | Aug 3, 2016 5:40:40 AM

Cornell ding.

Posted by: So&So | Aug 3, 2016 9:09:15 AM

So&So: when did you submit to Cornell?

Posted by: omar little | Aug 3, 2016 9:28:23 AM

I'm a bit annoyed. I have now had two journals, within minutes of my submission, write and tell me that they are full and that I should resubmit in the Spring. If that's the case, why are they accepting submissions (which, of course, cost money)????

Posted by: AnonProf | Aug 3, 2016 9:41:07 AM

@AnonProf: Care to say which journals? It'd save us some money.

Posted by: bell | Aug 3, 2016 10:07:56 AM

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