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Saturday, April 18, 2015

"Get off my lawn!" -- or, how (my) law-blogging has changed

I like the title of Paul's 10th anniversary, "How has blogging changed?" post better than the one I chose. (Maybe I should have gone with this, from Grandpa Simpson.)  And, I think Paul captured well a lot of what I wanted to say, at least with respect to the question "how has my blogging changed."  

I started blogging, at Mirror of Justice, in 2004 (and came a bit late to the Prawfsblawg crew).  I used to post more often, and about more things.  I'm not sure why, but tenure, promotion, and a stint in administration seem to have coincided with (even if not caused) a kind of narrowing.  As Paul discussed, I think I'm more reluctant than I was before 2008 to blog about our law-teaching vocation, at least in part out of nervousness about being flamed in comments or elsewhere for being self-indulgent or omphaloskeptical.  And, I think I'm more hesitant than I was when I started about addressing politically charged, "hot button," or "culture war" issues of the day, including the law-and-religion area in which I write.  This trend puts me in a bit of a bind:  I'm getting uneasy and hesitant about blogging about (a) what I do and (b) what I write about.  I'm not sure what's left . . . Duke basketball (or Notre Dame football)?  Adverbs (and here)?  Skyscrapers?

But that's just me.  How has blogging, or law-blogging more specifically, changed?  Dave's right, I think:   It's become, in various ways, more "serious."  There's maybe a chicken-and-the-egg dynamic here:  Once the Supreme Court cited law blogs, helping to validate them as more than just vehicles for doodles and musings, it became possible -- and then, perhaps, expected -- that blog-content would shift toward being the kind of stuff that could be cited by the Supreme Court.  Thankfully, over the last ten years, other outlets have proliferated for the doodles, musings, clever quips, and ironic bon mots -- Twitter, Instagram, and (for the oldsters among us) Facebook.  I suppose, before long, these will be transformed by respectability, too, and we'll have to work harder on crafting Robert Jackson-esque (or KimKierkegaardashianian) tweets.       

Posted by Rick Garnett on April 18, 2015 at 09:34 AM in Rick Garnett | Permalink

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