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Monday, December 01, 2014

Did You Hear the One About the Lawyer…

…who brought home a shoplifter for Christmas?  This is the premise for one of my favorite “lawyer” holiday films – “Remember the Night” (1940) – and one that almost made the final cut for my book (please pardon the plug) that employs classic films to demonstrate important lawyering skills.  What’s interesting is that, despite its warm and gentle premise, this film likely never would have been made today – or, conversely, it would now be made much differently.  This film is airing on TCM later this week. For those who show film clips in their classes, there are many here to consider using, especially the trial scenes. 

Speaking of films, I plan to spend my visit this month focusing on classic films and professionalism in the law.  I am honored to visit again in our shared effort to keep this wonderful Blog thriving in Dan’s memory.

Posted by Kelly Anders on December 1, 2014 at 02:39 PM in Culture, Film, Teaching Law | Permalink

Comments

Thanks for the plug (book looks interesting) and movie cite -- there is a ton of Christmas movies on, but might just catch that one!

"The Marrying Kind" (Judy Holliday) was on recently -- "In the New York Court of Domestic Relations, Judge Anna Carroll presides over the divorce hearing of Florence and Chet Keefer, whose lawyers insist their clients' marriage is over." http://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title/27658/The-Marrying-Kind/


Posted by: Joe | Dec 2, 2014 11:04:18 AM

Thanks, Joe. I will check it out. Holliday was featured in two films in the book: "Born Yesterday" and "Adam's Rib."

Posted by: Kelly Anders | Dec 4, 2014 4:34:05 PM

Saw the movie tonight. It was on the same time as "Christmas in Connecticut," but sure I can catch that later on. Charming.

Posted by: Joe | Dec 4, 2014 11:39:13 PM

Great to hear that you enjoyed it! I watched it again, too. I found it especially interesting that the lawyer was tempted to "bend" the law, while the accused was the one to keep him on the straight and narrow. The film that followed, "Meet John Doe," also made the short list.

Posted by: Kelly Anders | Dec 5, 2014 11:17:10 AM

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