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Friday, May 02, 2014

Spring Self-Reported Entry Level Hiring 2014 - JD Schools, All Law Schools

Here is the breakout of what schools hires went to for their initial law degree for all tenure-track law school hires (i.e., not limited to U.S. law schools):

JD School Global.20140502

Yale 20; Harvard 12; Columbia 8; NYU 7; Stanford 6; Chicago 4; Michigan 4; Berkeley 3; Other 17.

Schools in the "other" category with two JD/LLBs who reported hires: Northwestern; UCLA.

Schools in the "other" category with one JD/LLB who reported hires: Ateneo de Manila (Phillipines); Cornell; Duke; Florida State; Fordham;  ITAM (Mexico); North Dakota; Thomas Jefferson; Tulane; Universidad Torcuato Di Tella; Virginia; no JD.

And here is the break-out for all tenure-track hires, whether or not in a law school, and whether or not in the United States:

JDSchoolTenureTrack.20140503

Yale 22; Harvard 12; Columbia 8; NYU 7; Stanford 6; Chicago 5; Michigan 4; Berkeley 3; Other 17.

Schools in the "other" category with two JD/LLBs who reported hires: Northwestern; UCLA.

Schools in the "other" category with one JD/LLB who reported hires: Ateneo de Manila (Phillipines); Cornell; Duke; Florida State; Fordham;  ITAM (Mexico); North Dakota; Thomas Jefferson; Tulane; Universidad Torcuato Di Tella; Virginia; no JD.

Originally posted 5/2/14; edited 5/3/14 to reflect additional hire and to add second graph (of all tenure-track hires); edited 5/4/14, 5/6/14 to reflect three additional hires.

Posted by Sarah Lawsky on May 2, 2014 at 08:09 PM in Entry Level Hiring Report, Getting a Job on the Law Teaching Market | Permalink

Comments

I asked a version of this on the other thread, but since I see this is listed separately, let me ask here: these tallies include *only* tenure-track jobs in law schools, whether academic, clinical, or legal writing, is that right? So they exclude tenure-track jobs in business schools, etc. Chicago had 5 not 4 tenure-track placements out of our 7 candidate, but one was at Wharton, and I assume that's how you arrived at 4. (I'm hopeful we may have one more tenure-track placement, and will make sure the information is sent your way if and when that happens.) Thanks.

Posted by: Brian | May 3, 2014 11:17:50 AM

Yes, that's correct--when you posted this comment, it was only law schools. But there's absolutely no reason for me not to run the overall list--so I have now added that to this post.

Posted by: Sarah Lawsky | May 3, 2014 11:31:44 AM

Do US law schools still offer LLB degrees? (In New Zealand, the LLB remains an undergraduate degree). If not. what is a JD/LLB?

Posted by: Thomas NZ | May 7, 2014 5:15:52 PM

LLB used to be a post-graduate degree in the US and some people on the law professor market may potentially have been awarded an LLB either from a US institution at some time in the past, or from a non-US law school that awards LLBs.

Posted by: anon | May 7, 2014 7:27:07 PM

I think the slash means "or" -- JD/LLB means JD or LLB.

Posted by: anon | May 7, 2014 7:46:03 PM

The thing is, in the U.S.A., the "LL.B." should nearly always be read as the same as a J.D. My understanding is that Yale was the last law school (or nearly the last) to change the name of the three-year, most common, law degree it awarded, after three years of post-undergraduate-degree study, from "LL.B." to "J.D." Many law schools, however, called the three-year American law degree a "J.D." from *very* early on (I think Chicago and Boalt would be among the ones to call it the "J.D." from near the time of World War I), while places like Georgetown and Yale were still awarding "LL.B.'s" as late as the 1950's. But, for American law schools, the two things mean the same thing: the person graduated from college, with something like a degree in philosophy or Bio, and then got a three-year degree from a law school, and was able to take the Bar Exam and (if he/she passed it) practice law. Since about 1970, *all* U.S. three-year law degrees are called "J.D." I think Sarah Lawsky leaves in "J.D./LL.B." because there is always the chance that some first-time professors will have graduated from law school way back, and their initial American law degree will be called the good old "LL.B." Of course, at some point in time, asking for information on one's "LL.B.", from an American-trained lawyer at least, will be an anachronism.

As the above comments show, outside the U.S., and especially in other Anglo-sphere nations (at least as far as I know), the LL.B. is very often the undergraduate (undergraduate college) degree in law, which is often the person's first higher education degree (though I don't *think* in England, for instance, it *has* to be this, though I could be wrong).

Posted by: Bradford W. Short | May 8, 2014 12:46:36 AM

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