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Friday, December 13, 2013

Lawyers and Nigerian princes

Amazing. The Disciplinary Board had argued before the Iowa Supreme Court that his conduct was "delusional, but not fraudulent"--he honestly believed he was going to get $ 18 million for his clients. He just did not do sufficient due diligence (including internet searches) before bringing clients in on the adventure. The Court suspended his license for one year, a less severe sanction than the Board had recommended.

Somehow, no doubt, law professors are to blame.

Posted by Howard Wasserman on December 13, 2013 at 06:42 AM in Howard Wasserman | Permalink

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Comments

He should be taken for a test by an expert on his actual mental state of health to assertain the fact if his conduct was actually delusional or not,then he can be taken up to face the charges of the offence.

Posted by: Uba Babs | Jan 28, 2014 6:51:57 AM

He should be taken for a test by an expert on his actual mental state of health to assertain the fact if his conduct was actually delusional or not,then he can be taken up to face the charges of the offence.

Posted by: Uba Babs | Jan 29, 2014 3:09:12 AM

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