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Tuesday, July 30, 2013

Books to Enjoy in Fall 2013

I've been reading through Publisher's Weekly Fall 2013 announcements partly because, excitingly, they selected Talent Wants to Be Free for the business list, describing it as "a compelling argument for a new set of attitudes toward human capital that will sharpen our competitive edge and fuel the creative sparks in any environment."

There are several books that sound very interesting, particularly for prawfs. Alan Greenspan has a book out in October, The Map and the Territory: Risk, Human Nature, and the Future of Forecasting, promising a master class in economic decision making. The book takes on diverse issues including the welfare state, global warming, and of course, competition with China. If you are one of many of us fascinated with China there are several more books offering new perspectives. The one that seems most insightful is by Stephen Roach, Unbalanced: The Codependency of America and China.

For all of us who teach law and are thinking seriously about the future of legal education, a new book by Liz Brown, Life After Law: Finding Work You Love with the J.D. You Have, promises to show "lawyers how to reframe their legal experience and education to their competitive advantage to find work they truly love, with specific and realistic advice on alternative careers for lawyers." I've always thought we often have too much of a narrow view of what career paths of lawyers look like - many former students and former law school friends describe themselves as having abandoned the law and changed careers when in fact their paths have been much aided by their law degree.

If you liked Lean In, a new book continues the conversation, Liz O'Donnell, Mogul, Mom & Maid: The Balancing Act of the Modern Woman.

Finally for fun reading, I ordered Scott Adam's "most personal book ever" - a memoir by the Dilbert creator, How to Fail at Almost Everything and Still Win Big: Kind of the Story of My Life.

Posted by Orly Lobel on July 30, 2013 at 03:35 PM | Permalink

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"Alan Greenspan has a book out in October, The Map and the Territory: Risk, Human Nature, and the Future of Forecasting, promising a master class in economic decision making. "

I tend to look at him as discredited by now; he built the current crashed system.

"I've always thought we often have too much of a narrow view of what career paths of lawyers look like - many former students and former law school friends describe themselves as having abandoned the law and changed careers when in fact their paths have been much aided by their law degree."

How often is it clear that a law degree helps in such cases?

Posted by: Barry | Jul 31, 2013 1:43:57 PM

@barry - Greenspan's new book is his first after about 8 years since the last one, and he takes on this very question of the crash and crises.
with JD careers, not unlike MBAs, it is of course difficult to know what would have happened without the degree and this is the subject of much debate right now in our midst - see the recent Leiter blog postings about the value of a law degree. But my experience has been that many of the non-traditional jobs my students have taken were very much related to what they learned to love in law school - jobs related to policy, social movements, leadership, education, politically minded enrepeneurship, research, international careers that in many ways linked back to their experiences and strengths that were built during their years in law school.

Posted by: orly lobel | Jul 31, 2013 1:52:31 PM

"Greenspan's new book is his first after about 8 years since the last one, and he takes on this very question of the crash and crises. "

The last thing I heard him say was the widely-mocked 'with notable exceptions...' speech, and that was 2-3 years ago.

Posted by: Barry | Aug 1, 2013 1:09:50 PM

Orly, thanks for the kind words about Life After Law: Finding Work You Love with the JD You Have. I'm now a business law professor myself and a great fan of your blog. I'll also second your recommendation of Liz O'Donnell's Mogul, Mom & Maid - she is a terrific and knowledgeable writer.

Posted by: Liz Brown | Aug 4, 2013 9:00:12 PM

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